Showing posts with label Maryland. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Maryland. Show all posts

Interface in the Field: Achieving Reliable Interface Measurement to Optimize Process and Increase Uptime

Interface or multiphase level measurements exist throughout the Oil & Gas streams as well as Petrochemical. While level measurement technologies have come a long way in effectively measuring liquids and solids, multiphase level measurement continues to be the biggest challenge and opportunity that exists today to which there is no perfect technology.

However, experience has shown that process optimization and increased uptime can still be achieved in many separator applications through reliable, best-in-class, level technology.

The objective of this paper is to review interface challenges, the current technologies being utilized for interface, field experience in various applications to achieve process optimization and increased uptime, and the future of reliable interface measurement.

DOWNLOAD THE TECHNICAL PAPER HERE

Courtesy of Magnetrol and Miller Energy, Inc.
https://millerenergy.com
800-631-5454

ASCO Express Product Catalog

The ASCO Express program features a range of flow control products and accessories available for shipment the same day you order them. The products listed in this catalog provide the performance required for a variety of system and process applications including boiler, air handling, process control, and water and steam control. The control voltages available for each product are the primary voltages used in industrial and commercial applications today.

908-755-6700

Water and Wastewater Treatment Applications for the Magnetrol R82 Pulse Burst Radar Transmitters


The Magnetrol R82 Pulse Burst Radar transmitter performs across a wide range of applications. The R82 is designed to provide radar reliable process measurement in challenging, vapor saturated environments, at the cost of what you pay for an ultrasonic device. For water treatment, the Magnetrol R82 Pulse Burst Radar transmitter provides continuous level measurement at the lift station and coagulant feed tanks, in settling tanks during clarification, in polymer, filter, and lime slurry tanks during filtration, and for open atmosphere water reservoirs where the control technology must withstand punishing weather conditions.  In wastewater facilities, the R82 radar can control level at the lift station pump, open channel flow and screening system, monitor feed tanks containing chemical coagulants oxidants and phosphorous precipitation, measure splitter box in clarifier levels, control corrosion inhibitors, manage pH adjustment, mixed liquor and secondary clarifier levels, as well as activated sludge and digester level control.

Miller Energy, Inc.
https://millerenergy.com

How Do Pilot Operated Tank Relief Valves Work?

Storage tanks become pressurized when liquid is pumped in and compresses the existing tank vapor. Tanks also become pressurized due to increasing ambient temperatures, which cause the tank vapor to expand. To mitigate damage from these expanding tank vapors, pressure relief valves are installed on tanks to prevent structural damage resulting from over-pressure.

Here is an excellent animation, courtesy of Cashco, that shows how a pilot operated relief vent protects a storage tank from over pressurizing during a pump-in situation or during thermal heating conditions.


For more information on tank relief valves, contact Miller Energy at www.millerenergy.com or by calling 908-755-6700.

Thermal Mass Flow Meter Q&A From Magnetrol

thermal mass flow meter
Thermatel® thermal mass flow meter
Courtesy Magnetrol®
Sometimes you discover that others do something better than you. When that happens, watch and listen.

Tom Kemme, from Magnetrol®, expertly fielded some questions about thermal mass flow meters in a recent blog post. Mr. Kemme's responses were so useful and clear that I decided, with all the credit flowing his way, to share them here for those of you that may not closely follow the Magnetrol® Blog.

Question: What is the difference between the flow units Nm3/h, Sm3/h, and actual m3/h?

Answer: Actual m3/h is a flow rate at operating temperature and pressure. Normal or standard m3/h (Nm3/h = Sm3/h) is a flow rate at standard temperature and pressure (STP). I tend to reference the natural gas industry, where it is not possible to compare flow rates at every operating condition, so it is preferable to reference all flow rates back to a set of base conditions, such as 60°F and 1 atm. STP is not universal so it may be unique based on the region or industry.

Most flow meters output a flow rate at operating conditions and need to correct this measurement. This may be accomplished with a multivariable transmitter or external to the device. A few examples that do not need to correct the measurement are thermal mass flow meters, such as the ones produced by MAGNETROL, and Coriolis flow meters.

Question: Do you have any certified failure rate data on your units to perform an SIL verification?

Answer: A Failure Modes, Effects, and Diagnostics Analysis (FMEDA) is completed during development to determine failure rates and Safe Failure Fraction (SFF). The SFF is utilized to determine Safety Integrity Level (SIL), which is often the published value.

Question: What should my meter be reading with no air flow in the pipe?

Answer: At zero flow and a dry pipe, a thermal mass flow meter should measure zero. Different thermal meters may have varying stability at no flow due to differences in operation.

There are two different types of operation: constant temperature (CT) and constant power (CP). CT devices start with a low power and this power increases with the flow rate to maintain the constant temperature difference (ΔT) between the RTDs. CP devices start with a high ΔT between RTDs at low flow and the ΔT decreases as the flow rate increases. CP may lack stability at zero flow due to possible convection currents associated with the high ΔT. CT will hold zero better, particularly devices that add less heat. For example, the maximum surface temperature of a TA2 probe is 4 C above process temperature. This is extremely low heat, eliminating convection currents due to the sensor. Convection currents could also occur through the pipe due to temperature variations.

It is also possible for a thermal meter to measure above zero during a no flow condition when there is pressure buildup in the line (typically a valve closed downstream). There may be low flow cutoff settings that can be changed to ignore nuisance measurements.


You can easily tap into Magnetrol® expertise to solve your flow measurement challenges. Reach out to a product specialist and combine your process knowledge with their flow measurement expertise to develop effective solutions.

Dynamic Compensation for Static Pressure Effects in Differential Pressure Measurement

DPharp gauge pressure transmitter
DPharp Gauge Pressure Transmitter
Courtesy Yokogawa
Attaining the best available performance and accuracy from any measuring device utilized in an industrial process is always advantageous. The scale of most industrial processes is such that even small inaccuracies in process measurement produce financially tangible impact. Differential pressure measurement, with wide application in the industrial process sphere, can be improved with the addition of a means to compensate for the real world effects of static pressure upon instrument performance.

Yokogawa Corporation has developed a means to dynamically compensate for static pressure effects in field measurements. The brief technical presentation below will help you understand how static pressure effects can impact your field measurements, as well as how Yokogawa’s Real-time Dynamic Compensation works to offset its impact.

More detailed product and application information is available from your Yokogawa specialist.



Diaphragm Pressure Gauges for Industrial Process Measurement

diaphragm pressure gauge for industrial process measurement
Example of a diaphragm pressure gauge
Courtesy Wika
Diaphragm pressure gauges, like every device and instrument intended for use in industrial process measurement and control, have their own set of attributes making them an advantageous choice for some range of applications. Silvia Weber, product manager at Wika, a globally recognized leader in the field of pressure and temperature gauges, wrote an article for Process Worldwide (process-worldwide.com/) about diaphragm pressure gauges.

The article is included below and provides a comparison of the differences between Bourdon tube and diaphragm operating mechanisms, focusing on design and operational features of diaphragm pressure gauges and the range of application criteria for which they may be the best choice.

Pressure gauges are utilized in most operations where fluids are moved through a system. Gauges, though mechanical in operation, remain a mainstay of fluid operations because of their reliability, local display, ruggedness, and lack of reliance on electric power for operation. There are countless pressure gauge configurations to suit every application. Specifying the best gauge configuration for an application is accomplished by combining your process knowledge with the application expertise of a product specialist.


Protect Valuable Pressure Gauges and Transmitters With a Pressure Limiting Valve

pressure limiting valve for gauge or transmitter protection
Pressure limiting valve provides gauge
or transmitter protection from spikes
Courtesy Mid-West Instruments
Pressure gauges and transmitters, commonly found in fluid process control operations, are vulnerable to damage from transient spikes in system pressure that may range beyond the instrument's working range. These pressure spikes can impact instrument calibration, or even render the instrument or gauge inoperative. The cost of replacing gauges or transmitters is substantial enough to warrant the use of protective devices to prevent exposure to pressure spikes.

Mid-West Instruments manufactures a line of pressure limiting valves specifically intended for use with pressure gauges and transmitters. The Model 200 pressure limiting valve prevents instrument over-range and has an adjustable needle valve to dampen pulsation. The valve and be used with all types of instruments and pressure gauges, is suitable for mounting in any position, and is available in a range of materials for body and seals.

The document below provides more product detail, as well as installation and setup instructions. Providing a useful measure of protection for pressure gauges and transmitters is a simple operation. Reach out to product application specialists for help in formulating effective solutions.



Industrial Process Gauges - New Product Guide

industrial pressure gauge
One of the many pressure gauge versions
employed throughout industry
Courtesy Ametek - U.S. Gauge
Even with the large growth in the use of electronic measurement instruments throughout the process control sphere, mechanical gauges and indicators remain an important part of process measurement and control operations.

A broad line of industrial gauges and diaphragm seals is available from U.S. Gauge. The company has consolidated its offering into a product guide that provides simple and quick reference to the various product series.

For pressure:

  • Process Gauges
  • Liquid Filled Gauges
  • Test Gauges
  • General Equipment Gauges
  • Special Application Gauges

For temperature:

  • Adjustable Bimetallic Thermometers
  • Thermowells
  • Industrial Bimetallic Thermometers
  • Multi-Angle Industrial Thermometers
  • Digital Thermometers
  • Glass Tube Thermometers
The product guide also includes diaphragm seals and a range of electronic indicators, as well.

The guide illustrates gauges for every industrial application. Share your process measurement and control challenges with product application specialists, combining your process knowledge with their product application expertise to develop effective solutions.



Basic Guide to Understanding Pressure

absolute pressure transmitter for industrial process measurement control
One style of absolute pressure transmitter
Courtesy Yokogawa
The impact of pressure on industrial processes would be difficult to understate. Pressure is an element of process control that can affect performance and safety. Understanding pressure concepts and how to effectively measure pressure within a process are key to any operator's success.

Yokogawa, a globally recognized leader in process measurement and control, has made available a handbook on pressure that covers a range of useful topics. The content starts with the very basic concepts and moves quickly to practical subjects related to process measurement and control.

The handbook will prove useful to readers at all levels of expertise. Share your process measurement challenges with application specialists, combining your process knowledge with their product application expertise to develop effective solutions.