Showing posts with label Metro New York. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Metro New York. Show all posts

Tutorial: The Yokogawa SMARTDAC+ GX/GP Paperless Recorder Channel Settings


The Yokogawa SMARTDAC+ GX and GP are fully integrated measurement, display, and recording platforms equipped with an advanced touch screen operator interface. GX series is a panel-mount design, capable of operating in harsh industrial applications and environments. GP is the portable version of the GX, intended for use in lab and test bench applications.

This video is a tutorial to learn the display settings available within the SmartDAC+  GX/GP's analog input, digital input, digital output, math, and communication channel settings.

For more information about the Yokogawa SMARTDAC+ GX/GP Paperless Recorder contact Miller Energy, Inc. Call them at 800-631-5454 or visit their web site at https://millerenergy.com.

Magnetrol Model A15 Single-Stage Displacer Level Control Switches


Displacer switch operation is based upon simple buoyancy, whereby a spring is loaded with weighted displacers, which are heavier than the liquid. Immersion of the displacers in the liquid results in buoyancy force change, changing the net force acting on the spring. The spring compresses as the buoyancy force increases.

A magnetic sleeve is connected to the spring and operates within a non-magnetic barrier tube. Spring movement causes the magnetic sleeve to move into the field of a pivoted magnet, actuating a switch mechanism located outside the barrier tube. Built-in limit stops prevent over stroking of the spring, under level surge conditions.

The minimum differential band is approximately 6 inches (152 mm) in water and varies somewhat with liquid specific gravity. The maximum differential is determined by the length of the displacer suspension cable. Series A15 units are calibrated to operate over a narrow level differential band and are ideally suited for liquid level alarm applications on either high or low level.

For more information about Magnetrol Displacer Level Switches, contact Miller Energy, Inc. Call them at 800-631-5454 or visit their web site at https://millerenergy.com.

Control Valve Glossary

Reprinted with permission of Cashco.
Linear Control Valve Design
Click for larger view.
Actuator: An actuator is a pneumatic hydraulic, or electrically powered device which supplies force and motion to open or close a valve.

Airset: A regulator which is used to control the supply pressure to the valve actuator and its auxiliaries.

Angle valve: A valve design in which one port is collinear with the valve stem or actuator, and the other port is at a right angle to the valve stem.

Anti-cavitation trim: See “trim, anti-cavitation”. Anti-noise trim: See “trim, anti-noise”.

Bellows stem seal: A thin wall, convoluted, flexible component that makes a seal between the stem and bonnet or body and allows stem motion while maintaining a hermetic seal.

Benchset: The calibration of the actuator spring range of a control valve, to account for the in service process forces.

Body: The main pressure boundary of the valve that also provides the pipe connecting ends, the fluid flow passageway, and supports the seating surfaces and the valve closure member.

Bonnet: The portion of the valve that contains the packing box and stem seal and may guide the stem. It may also provide the principal opening to the body cavity for assembly of internal parts or be an integral part of the valve body. It may also provide for the attachment of the actuator to the valve body. Typical bonnets are bolted, threaded, welded to, pressure-sealed, or integral with the body.

Butterfly valve: A valve with a circular body and a rotary motion disk closure member, pivotally supported by its shaft.

Rotary Control Valve Design
Click for larger view.
Cage: A part of a valve trim that surrounds the closure member and may provide flowcharacterization and/ or a seating surface. It may also provide stability, guiding, balance, and alignment, and facilitate assembly of other parts of the valve trim.

Capacity: The rate of flow through a valve under stated conditions.

Cavitation: A two-stage phenomenon of liquid flow. The first stage is the formation of vapor bubbles
within liquid system due to static pressure of fluid at vena contracta falling below the fluid vapor pressure; the second stage is the collapse or implosion of these cavities back into an all-liquid state as the fluid decelerates and static pressure is recovered.

Characteristic, flow: An indefinite term, see “characteristic, inherent flow” and “characteristic, installed flow.”

Characteristic, equal percentage: An inherent flow characteristic which, for equal increments of rated travel, will ideally give equal percentage changes of the existing flow coefficient (cv).

Characteristic, inherent: The relationship between the flow coefficient (cv) and the closure member travel as it is moved from the closed position to rated travel with constant pressure drop across the valve.

Characteristic, linear: An inherent flow characteristic that can be represented by a straight line on a rectangular plot of flow coefficient (cv) versus rated travel. Therefore, equal increments of travel provide equal increments of flow coefficient (cv).

Characteristic, quick opening: An inherent flow characteristic in which a maximum flow coefficient is achieved with minimal closure member travel.

Characterized cam: A component in a valve positioner used to relate the closure member position to the control signal.

Characterized trim: Control valve trim that provides predefined flow characteristics.

Closure member: The movable part of the valve that is positioned in the flow path to modify the rate of flow through the valve.

Closure member configurations (plug):
  • Characterized: Closure member with contoured surface, such as the “vee plug,” to provide various flow characteristics.
  • Cylindrical: A cylindrical closure member with a flow passage through it (or a partial cylinder).
  • Eccentric: Closure member face is not concentric with the stem centerline and moves into seat when closing.
  • Eccentric spherical disk: Disk is spherical segment, not concentric with the disk stem.
  • Linear: A closure member that moves in a line perpendicular to the seating plane.
  • Rotary: A closure member which is rotated into or away from a seat to modulate flow.
Coefficient, flow: A constant (cv) related to the geometry of a valve, for a given valve travel, that can be used to predict flow rate.

Control valve: A valve which controls the flow rate or flow direction in a fluid system. The final control element, through which a fluid passes, that adjusts the flow passage as directed by a signal from a cont- roller to modify the flow rate.

Dual sealing valve: A valve that uses a resilient seating material for the primary seal and a metal-to-metal seat for a secondary seal.

End connection: The configuration provided to make a joint with the pipe.
  • End connections, flanged: Valve body with end connections incorporating flanges that mate with corresponding flanges on the piping.
  • End connections, split clamp: Valve end connections of various proprietary designs using split clamps to apply gasket or mating surface loading.
  • End connections, threaded: Valve end connections incorporating threads, either male or female.
  • End connections, welded: Valve end connections which have been prepared for welding to the line pipe or other fittings. May be butt weld (bw), or socket weld (sw).
Erosion resistant trim: Valve trim, that has been designed with special surface materials or geometry to resist the erosive effects of the controlled fluid flow.

Extension bonnet: A bonnet with a packing box that is extended above the bonnet joint of the valve body so as to maintain the temperature of the packing above or below the temperature of the process fluid. The length of the extension bonnet is dependent upon the difference between the fluid temperature and the packing design temperature limit as well as upon the valve body design.

Face to face dimension: The dimension from the face of the inlet opening to the face of the outlet opening of a valve or fitting.

Facing, flange: The finish on the end connection that mates with gasket surfaces.

Failure mode: The position to which the valve closure member moves when the actuating energy source fails.
  • Fail-closed: A condition wherein the valve closure member moves to a closed position when the actuating energy source fails.
  • Fail-in place: A condition wherein the valve closure member stays in its last position when the actuat- ing energy source fails.
  • Fail-open: A condition wherein the valve closure member moves to an open position when the actuat- ing energy source fails.
  • Fail-safe: A characteristic of a particular valve and its actuator, which upon loss of actuating energy supply, will cause a valve closure member to fully close, fully open or remain in fixed last position. Fail-safe action may involve the use of auxiliary controls connected to the actuator.
Flangeless control valve: A valve without integral line flanges, which is installed by bolting between companion flanges, with a set of bolts, or studs, generally extending through the companion flanges.

Guides, closure component: The means by which the closure is aligned with the seat and held stable throughout its travel. The guide is held rigidly in the body, bonnet, and/or bottom plate.

Hand jack: A manual override device, using a lever, to stroke a valve or to limit its travel.

Handwheel: A mechanical manual override device, using a rotary wheel, to stroke a valve or to limit its travel.

Hard facing: A material applied to valve internals to resist fluid erosion and/or to reduce the chance of galling between moving parts, particularly at high temperatures.

Hard plating: A thin metal deposit, sometimes electroplated, used to induce surface hardening. Hard plating is many orders of magnitude thinner than hard facing.

Hysteresis: The maximum difference in output value for any single input value during a calibration cycle, excluding errors due to dead band.

Integral seat: A flow control orifice and seat that is an integral part of the body or cage.

Jacketed valves: A valve body cast with a double wall or provided with a double wall by welding material around the body so as to form a passage for a heating or cooling medium. Also refers to valves which are enclosed in split metal jackets having internal heat passageways or electric heaters. Also referred to as “steam jacketed” or “vacuum jacketed.” in a vacuum jacketed valve, a vacuum is created in the space between the body and secondary outer wall to reduce the transfer of heat by convection from the atmosphere to the internal process fluid, usually cryogenic.

Lantern ring: A rigid spacer assembled in the packing box with packing normally above and below it and designed to allow lubrication of the packing or access for a leak-off connection.

Lapping-in: A process of mating contact surfaces by grinding and/or polishing.

Leakage, class: Classifications established by ansi b16.104 to categorize seat leakage tolerances for different sizes of control valve trim.

Leakage, seat: The quantity of fluid passing through a valve when the valve is in the fully closed position with pressure differential and temperature as specified.

Leak-off gland: A packing box with packing above and below the lantern ring so as to provide a collection point for fluid leaking past the primary seal (lower packing).

Lined valve body: A valve body in which a coating or liner has been applied to internal surfaces for cor- rosion/erosion protection or for flow shut off.

Liner, slip-in: An annular shaped liner which makes a slight interference fit with the body bore and which may be readily forced into position through the body end. May be plain or reinforced. Applies to butterfly valves.

Liquid pressure recovery factor: The ratio (fl) of the valve flow coefficient (cv) based on the pressure drop at the vena contracta, to the usual valve flow coefficient (cv) which is based on the overall pressure drop across the valve in non-vaporizing liquid service. These coefficients compare with the orifice metering coefficients of discharge for vena contracta taps and pipe taps, respectively. See ansi/isa-s75.01 “control valve sizing equations.”

Lubricator isolating valve: A manually operated valve used to isolate the packing lubricator assembly from the packing box.

Lubricator packing box: A packing arrangement consisting of a lantern ring with packing rings above and below with provision to lubricate the packing.

Mechanical limit stop: A mechanical device to limit the valve stem travel.

Mounting position: The location and orientation of an actuator or auxiliary component relative to the control valve. This can apply to the control valve itself relative to the piping.

Multiple orifice: A style of valve trim where the flow passes through a multiple of orifices in parallel or in series.

Nominal size: A numerical designation of size which is common to all components in a piping system other than components designated by outside diameters or by thread size. It is a convenient round number for reference purposes and is only loosely related to manufacturing dimensions. Iso uses initials dn as an abbreviation for the term with the letters dn followed by a numerical value designating size. All equipment of the same nominal size and nominal pressure rating shall have the same mating dimensions appropriate to the type of end connections.

Packing: A sealing system consisting of deformable material contained in a packing box which usually has an adjustable compression means to obtain or maintain an effective seal.

Packing box: The chamber, in the bonnet, surrounding the stem and containing packing and other stem sealing parts.

Packing flange: A device that transfers the deforming mechanical load to the packing follower.

Packing follower: A part which transfers the deforming mechanical load to the packing from the packing flange or nut.

Packing lubricator assembly: A device for injection of lubricant/sealer into a lubricator packing box.

Pinch or clamp valve: A valve consisting of a flexible elastomeric tubular member connected to two rigid flow path ends whereby modulation and/or shut off of flow is accomplished by squeezing the flexible member into eventual tight sealing contact.

Plug: A term frequently used to refer to the closure member.

Plug valve: A rotary motion valve with a closure member that may be cylindrical or conical. Port: The flow control orifice of a control valve.

Port guiding: A valve closure member with wings or a skirt fitting into the seat ring bore.

Positioner: A position controller, which is mechanically connected to a moving part of a final control element or its actuator, and automatically adjusts its output pressure to the actuator in order to maintain a desired position that bears a predetermined relationship to the input signal. The positioner can be used to modify the action of the valve (reversing positioner), extend the stroke/controller.

Positioner, double acting: A positioner with two outputs, suited to a double acting actuator.

Positioner, single acting: A positioner with one output, suited to a spring opposed actuator.

Position switch: A position switch is a pneumatic, hydraulic or electrical device which is linked to the valve stem to detect a single, preset valve stem position.

Position transmitter: The position transmitter is a device that is mechanically connected to the valve stem or shaft and generates and transmits a pneumatic or electrical signal representing the valve position.

Post guiding: A design using guide bushing or bushings fitted into the bonnet or body to guide the plug’s post.

Pressure energized seal: A seal energized by differential pressure.

Rangeability inherent: The ratio of the largest flow coefficient (cv) to the smallest flow coefficient (cv) within which the deviation from the specified inherent flow characteristic does not exceed the stated limits.

Rated travel: The amount of movement of the valve closure member from the closed position to the rated full open position.

Seat: The area of contact between the closure component and its mating surface which establishes valve shut-off.

Seat ring: A part of the valve body assembly that provides a seating surface for the closure member and may provide part of the flow control orifice.

Shaft: The mechanical member used to support a rotary closure member.

Spring rate: The force change per unit change in length of a spring.

Stem connector: The device which connects the actuator stem to the valve stem. Stem guide: A guide bushing closely fitted to the valve stem and aligned with the seat.

Three-way valve: A valve with three end connections, used for mixing or diverting flow.

Throttling: The action of a control valve to regulate fluid flow by varying the position of the closure member. This service generates a variable pressure drop.

Transducer: A device that is actuated by power from one system and supplies power in another form to a second system.

Travel: The movement of the closure member from the closed position to an intermediate or rated full open position.

Travel indicator: A pointer and scale used to externally show the position of the closure member; typically in terms of units of opening percent of travel or degrees of rotation.

Trim: The internal components of a valve which modulate the flow of the controlled fluid.
  • Trim, anti-cavitation: A combination of control valve trim that by its geometry reduces the tendency of the controlled liquid to cavitate.
  • Trim, anti-noise: A combination of control valve trim that by its geometry reduces the noise generated by fluid flowing through the valve.
  • Trim, balanced: Control valve trim designed to minimize the net static and dynamic fluid flow forces acting on the trim.
  • Trim, reduced: Control valve trim which has a flow area smaller than the full flow area for that valve. Trim, soft seated: Valve trim with an elastomeric, plastic or other readily deformable material used
  • either in the closure component or seat ring to provide tight shutoff with minimal actuator forces.
Unbalance, dynamic: The net force/torque produced on the valve stem/shaft by fluid pressure acting on the closure member and stem/shaft at stated travel and flowing conditions.

Unbalance, static: The net force produced on the valve stem by the fluid pressure acting on the closure member and stem with the fluid at rest and with stated pressure conditions.

Valve: A device used for the control of fluid flow, consisting of a fluid retaining assembly, one or more ports between end openings and a movable closure member which opens, restricts or closes the port(s).
  • Balve, ball: A valve with a rotary motion closure member consisting of a full ball or a segmented ball.
  • Valve, diaphragm type: A valve with a flexible linear motion closure member which is moved into the
  • fluid flow passageway of the body to modify the rate of flow through the valve by the actuator.
  • Valve, floating ball: A valve with a full ball positioned within the valve that contacts either of two seat rings and is free to move toward the seat ring opposite the pressure source when in the closed position to effect tight shutoff.
  • Valve, globe: A valve with a linear motion closure member, one or more ports and a body distinguished by a globular shaped cavity around the port region.
Vena contracta: The location in a flow stream where fluid velocity is at its maximum and fluid static pressure and the cross-sectional area are at their minimum. In a control valve, the vena contracta normally occurs just downstream of the actual physical restriction.

Yoke: The structure which rigidly connects the actuator power unit to the valve.

Glossary courtesy of Cashco, Inc. For more information about Cashco products, contact Miller Energy, Inc. Call them at 800-631-5454 or visit their web site at https://millerenergy.com.

How Do Magnetic Level Indicators Work?

Magnetic Level IndicatorMagnetic Level Indicators also known as MLIs, have revolutionized the global visual indication market by offering a safer, reliable, and high-visibility alternative to common gauge glass assemblies.  They provide high-visibility representation of the liquid level in a vessel. MLIs can be mounted to tanks in a number of different ways. The most popular configuration, however, is called a side-mount.

The Magnetic Level Indicator (MLI) working principle is widely used in many industrial level applications. The operating principle behind a magnetic level indicator is that the MLI shares the same process fluid as the vessel, and therefore shares the same level.

The three primary components to a Magnetic Level Indicator are:
  • The float
  • The chamber
  • The visual indicator

Magnetic Level IndicatorThe float (contained within the chamber) interacts with the externally mounted visual indicator. As liquid rises and falls in the vessel and MLI chamber, the float follows. The magnets in the float interact with magnets inside each indicator flag. As the float rises and falls in the chamber, the magnets slowly turn each flag 180 degrees. This allows the visible flag color to change to a high-contrasting, highly-visible representation of liquid level.



Magnetic Level Indicator



Utilizing a combination of proven buoyancy principles along with the benefits magnetism, MLIs can be customized to fit virtually any process connection arrangement on the vessel.

The chamber and magnetic float is available in a variety of materials and pressure ratings to accommodate the wide variety of complex process applications present in the world’s major industrial facilities.

Areas Where Magnetic Level Indicator Are Applied:

  • Feed water heaters and boilers
  • Refinery and chemical industries
  • Energy and power plant technology
  • Pulp and paper applications
  • Oil and gas industries
  • Gas plants
  • Pipeline compressor applications
  • Pharmaceutical applications
  • Food and beverage applications

For more information about Magnetic Level Indicators (MLI's), contact Miller Energy by calling 800-631-5454 or visit their web site at https://millerenergy.com.

Process Instrumentation and Valves for the Chemical and Petrochemical Industries


Miller Energy provides process control instruments and valves designed to assist in higher quality yields, more efficient processes, and greater plant safety for chemical processing and petrochemical refining manufacturing facilities. 


The Chemical Industry


The chemical industry is key to industrial production. It transforms the raw materials of animals, vegetables and minerals into a host of products used by both the industrial and domestic customers. Lightweight and durable plastic products contribute to fuel effectiveness in transportation, energy-saving insulation material in buildings, paints and protective coatings that extend metal and wood life, soap, shampoo and detergents maintain us clean, pharmaceuticals and disinfectants protect our health. Without vital chemicals, computers and telecommunications systems could not work.

The industry has matured using local resources such as salt, coal, lime, vegetable products and animal fats. It is now a worldwide sector that mainly uses natural gas and oil fractions such as naphtha as the main raw materials. There is a strong awareness of the need to substitute fossil resources both as raw materials and for process energy with sustainable options.

The Petrochemical Manufacturing Industry


The sector produces petrochemicals which are petroleum and natural gas chemicals (organic compounds not burned as fuel). Ethylene, propylene, butylene, benzene, toluene, styrene, xylene, ethyl benzene and cumene are key products. These products are fundamental construction blocks in the manufacturing of consumer products, automotive parts and numerous sustainable and unsustainable goods. These products are fundamental construction blocks in the manufacturing of consumer products, automotive parts and numerous durable goods. This sector does not include organic compounds such as ethyl alcohol and inorganic chemicals such as carbon black.

Olefins and aromatics constitute the building blocks of a large variety of products, including solvents, detergents and adhesives. Polymers and oligomers used in plastics, resins, fibers, elastomers, lubricants and gels are built upon olefins.

Miler Energy: Chemical and Petrochemical Instrumentation and Valve Experts


Miller Energy offers a broad range of instrumentation and valves for these diverse markets. Since 1958, Miller Energy, Inc. has exceeded customers expectations in the Chemical and Petrochemical Industries by specifying and providing the highest quality instrumentation and valves. Known for unparalleled customer service and local technical support, Miller's comprehensive line of pressure, temperature, level, flow and analytical products are available now and ready to solve your most challenging chemical and petrochemical applications.

Contact the Miller Energy office in your area by visiting this web page, or call 800-631-5454 for further assistance.

Installing the ASCO 212 Series Composite Valve Using the FasN Connection System


The ASCO series 212 composite valve is intended for use in applications for water purification and water treatment, especially in the implementation of the membrane-based filtration. The composite valve series 212 is perfect for use in mid-size Reverse Osmosis Systems apps requiring lead-free and NSF-approved construction. The series 212 composite valves are available in 3/8", 1/2", 3/4", and 1" pipe sizes rated for pressures up to 150 PSIG and 180 degrees F.

The video above demonstrates how to install the series 212 using the patented ASCO FasN system for NPT threaded connections, turn and lock connections, and solvent bond connections.

For more information, contact Miller Energy Inc. by calling 800-631-5454 or visit their web site at https://millerenergy.com.

How to Change Loss of Signal Failure Mode on the Cashco Ranger Control Valve


This video provides step-by-step instructions on how to change the Cashco Ranger (control valve) loss of signal failure mode from air to open / fail closed to air to close/ fail open, as well as remounting and recalibrating the valve positioner.

The Cashco Ranger is one of the most popular control valves on the market. It is the most versatile, adaptable, and easily maintainable valve ever produced.

The Ranger offers over 6 different trim combinations. Trim can easily be changed in less than 5 minutes without disturbing the packing, actuator, or positioner calibration. The service area is a thread-less design, which resists corrosion or collection of chemical deposits.

A selection of 3 body materials with a broad temperature range from -325°F to +750°F makes the Ranger adaptable for use in steam, heat transfer fluids, slurries, gases, liquids, and cryogenic applications. The Ranger’s unique dual seating design provides both Class VI and backup Class IV seat leakage. And the standard patented live-loaded packing system lets you check and adjust packing without the need for specialized tools or complicated procedures.

For more information about Cashco in Metro New York, New Jersey, and Eastern Pennsylvania contact:

Miller Energy, Inc.
New York Metro and Northern NJ: 800-631-5454
Eastern PA, Southern NJ, Delaware: 888-631-5454
https://www.millerenergy.com

Refractometry in Oil Refining and the Petrochemical Industry: Sulfuric Acid Alkylation

Refractometers Used in Sulfuric Acid Alkylation

SULFURIC ACID, H2SO4
Typical end products

  • Alkylate (premium higher-octane gasoline blending stock for motor fuel and aviation gasoline).
Chemical curve: Sulfuric acid 88-100 R.I. per Conc wt.-% at Ref. Temp. of 20 ̊C

Refractometers Used in Sulfuric Acid Alkylation



Introduction

Motor fuel alkylation using sulfuric acid (H2SO4) or liquid hydrofluoric acid (HF) is one of the oldest catalytic processes used in petroleum refining. The purpose of the alkylation is to improve motor and aviation gasoline properties (higher octane) with up to 90 % lower emissions compared to conventional fuel usage.

The problem with HF is that the catalyst forms a hazardous air pollutant when released as a superheated liquid, while H2SO4 does not. Therefore nearly 90 % of all alky units built since 1990 have adopted the H2SO4 technology. 

The leading alkylation unit licensor, with a 90 % share of the market, is DuPont (Stratco®). Another licensor is EMRE (Exxon Mobile Research Engineering, formerly K.W. Kellogg).

Application

In the process, isobutane is alkylated with low molecular weight olefins (propylene, butylene and pentylene) in the presence of a strong acid catalyst to form alkylate (the premium higher-octane gasoline blending stock). The catalyst (sulfuric acid) allows the two-phase reaction to be carried out at moderate temperatures. The phases separate spontaneously, so the acid phase is vigorously mixed with the hydrocarbon phase to form higher molecular weight isoparaffinic compounds.

After the reactor, the mixture enters a separation vessel where the acid and hydrocarbon separate. The acid is then recycled back to the reactor.

Instrumentation and installation

Refractometers Used in Sulfuric Acid AlkylationThe K-Patents Process Refractometer PR-43-GP is installed after the settlers to continuously monitor in real-time the concentration of acid in the process.

The concentration of sulfuric acid is critical to achieve the complete consumption of isobutane. A highly variable concentration of isobutane in the feedstock upsets the sulfuric acid content in the process.

It is important to determine the proper quantity of acid that will be fed into the process. This is achieved by combining routine sample titration analysis with continuous acid monitoring by the K-Patents Process Refractometer. Real-time measurements reduce the need for sampling and laboratory analyses that cause delay in the implementation of any necessary adjustments to the acid flow.

Continuous monitoring removes the uncertainty involved between titration measurements. The K-Patents refractometer will indicate any gradual fluctuations in the acid flow, allowing precise control over efficient acid consumption and resulting in cost savings. It is also useful in preventing acid runaway, an unwanted situation commonly described as wild acid.

Acid runaway may happen when the acid strength drops below 85-87 % H2SO4. As a result, the reactions between olefins and isobutane turn into reactions of olefins only, producing polymers known as acid sludge, ASO or red oil.

The K-Patents refractometer is not affected by acid soluble oil (ASO). The refractometer indicates actual acid strength regardless of the amount of hydrocarbons present, which is essential when transferring acid emulsion. It is also an extremely useful tool in real-time process acid strength measurement during agitated conditions.

The initial acid concentration is typically 85-100 % and the temperature is 15 °C (59 °F). The benefits of the K-Patents refractometer’s continuous monitoring system include substantial cost savings due to reduced acid consumption, and smooth alkylate production without acid runaways.

The K-Patents Process Refractometer System for Alkylation Acid Measurement Consists of:

  1. The K-Patents Process Refractometer PR-43 for hazardous locations in Zone 2. or The K-Patents PR-43 Intrinsically Safe model for installations in hazardous locations up to Zone 0.
  2. Optional parts:
    1. Different flow cell options for easy sensor installation
    2. EXd enclosure for easy isolator and transmitter mounting
    3. Parts for a start up
    4. Spare parts supplied for two years of operation
    5. Start-up and commissioning service
  3. User specified tests and documentation.

Alloy C-276/ASTM C276 should be considered as wetted parts material when the acid piping flow velocity is at a maximum of 6 m/s (20 ft/s). Alloy 20 can be considered when acid piping flow velocity is at a maximum of 1.8 m/s (6 ft/s). However, it is the responsibility of the end-user to specify the appropriate material, ensuring that it is satisfactory for the intended operating requirements.

Non-sparking incentive (Ex nA) and intrinsic safety (Ex ia) approvals are available for hazardous area installations.

Always consult an applications expert with any process-critical instrumentation application. By doing so, you will ensure a successful, safe, and efficient deployment.

Miller Energy, Inc.
https://millerenergy.com
800-631-5454

Reprinted with permission from K-Patents.

Hazardous Areas: Division and Zone Classification System

Hazardous area
Hazards areas are associated with flammable
vapors or gases, ignitable fibers, and combustible dusts.
Hazardous areas refer to locations with a possible risk of explosion or fire due to dangerous atmosphere. The hazards can be associated with flammable vapors or gases, ignitable fibers, and combustible dusts.

Different hazardous area classifications exist in the North America and Europe. Generally, the National Electric Code (NEC) classifications govern hazardous areas in the US. While in Europe, hazardous area classification has been specified by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC).

Below is a description of the Division and Zone classification system.



CLASS
NATURE OF HAZARDOUS MATERIAL
CLASS I
Hazardous area due the presence of flammable vapors or gases in sufficient quantities to produce ignitable mixtures and cause an explosion.
Examples include natural gas and liquified petroleum.
CLASS II
Hazardous area due the presence of conductive or combustible dusts in sufficient quantities to produce ignitable mixtures and cause an explosion.
Examples include aluminum and magnesium powders.
CLASS III
Hazardous area due the presence of flammable fibers or other flying debris that collect around lighting fixtures, machinery, and other areas in sufficient quantities to produce ignitable mixtures and cause an explosion.
Examples include sawdust and flyings



Division groups hazardous areas based on the chances of an explosion due to the presence of flammable materials in the area.

DIVISION
LIKELIHOOD OF HAZARDOUS MATERIAL
DIVISION 1
Areas where there is a high chance of an explosion due to hazardous material that is present periodically, intermittently, or continuously under normal operation.
DIVISION 2
Areas where there is a low chance of an explosion under normal operation.


Group categorizes areas based on the type of flammable or ignitable materials in the environment. As per NEC guidelines, Groups A to D classify gasses while Groups E to G classify dust and flying debris.
GROUP
TYPE OF HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN THE AREA
GROUP A
Acetylene.
GROUP B
Area contains flammable gas, liquid, or liquid produced vapor with any of the following characteristics:
  • Minimum Ignition Current (MIC) value equal to or less than 0.40
  • Maximum Experimental Safe Gap (MESG) value equal to or less than 0.45 mm
  • Combustible gas with more than 30 percent volume
Examples include hydrogen, ethylene oxide, acrolein, propylene oxide.

GROUP C
Area contains flammable gas, liquid, or liquid produced vapor with any of the following characteristics:
  • Minimum Ignition Current (MIC) value between 0.40 and 0.80
  • Maximum Experimental Safe Gap (MESG) value greater than 0.75 mm
Examples include carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulphide, ether, cyclopropane, morphline, acetaldehyde, isoprene, and ethylene.

GROUP D
Area contains flammable gas, liquid, or liquid produced vapor with any of the following characteristics:
  • Minimum Ignition Current (MIC) value greater than 0.80
  • Maximum Experimental Safe Gap (MESG) value greater than 0.75 mm
Examples include ammonia, gasoline, butane, benzene, hexane, ethanol, methane, methanol, natural gas, propane, naphtha, and vinyl chloride.

GROUP E
Area contains metal dusts such as magnesium, aluminum, chromium, bronze, titanium, zinc, and other combustible dusts whose abrasiveness, size, and conductivity present a hazard.

GROUP F
Area contains carbonaceous dusts such as charcoal, coal black, carbon black, coke dusts and others that present an explosion hazard.
GROUP G
Area contains combustible dusts not classified in Groups E and F.
Examples include starch, grain, flour, wood, plastic, sugar, and chemicals.


NOTE: This post serves only as a guide to acquaint the reader with hazardous area classifications in the USA. It is imperative to discuss your instrumentation, valve, or process equipment requirement with a qualified applications expert prior to installing any electrical device inside of any hazardous area.


Understanding How Magnetic Flowmeters Work and the Difference between AC and DC Excitation


The electromagnetic flowmeter, commonly known as the "magmeter", gets its name from the magnetic field generated within the float tube that produces a signal proportional to flow. This principle employs Faraday's Law of Electromagnetic Induction. Magnetic flowmeters are built so the direction of the magnetic field is perpendicular to the flow and the line between the electrodes is also perpendicular to the flow. As a conductive liquid flows through the flowtube, an electro-motive force is generated. The electrodes detect the electro-motive force. The electro-motive force is proportional to the flow velocity, flux density, and the meter inner diameter. The flux density of the magnetic field and the meters inner diameter are constant values, therefore the magnetic flow meter can calculate the flow velocity and volumetric flow from the electro-motive force.

The basic components of the magnetic flow meter body are:

  1. A lined flowtube (typically Teflon)
  2. Excitation coils
  3. Two electrodes mounted opposite of each other within the flowtube.

Current is applied to the coils in the magmeter to generate a magnetic field within the flow tube. As a conductive fluid flows through the meter, an electro-motive force is generated. This force is detected by the electrodes and the resulting value is converted to flowrate.

For more information on magnetic flowmeters, contact Miller Energy, Inc. by calling 800-631-5454 or by visiting https://millerenergy.com.

6 Benefits of Using Wireless Networking Systems in Industrial Applications

Wireless Networking Systems in Industrial ApplicationsWireless technologies offer great value over wired solutions. A reduction in cost is just one of the many benefits of switching to the wireless networking system. There are many benefits, including enhanced management of legacy systems that were previously not possible with a wired networking connection.

Here is an overview of some of the value-added benefits of adopting wireless networking in industrial plants.
  1. Reduced Installation Costs - Savings in installation costs is the key benefit of a wireless networking system. The cost of installing a wireless solution is significantly lower as compared to its wired counterpart. Installing a wireless network requires less planning. Extensive surveys are not required to route the wires to control rooms. This reduced installation cost is the main reason industrial setups should consider going wireless instead of having a wired networking system. 
  2. Improved Information Accuracy - Adopting wireless networking also results in improved accuracy of information. The wireless system is not prone to interferences. As a result, the system ensures consistent and timely transfer of information from one node to another. 
  3. Enhanced Flexibility - Enhanced flexibility is another reason for deploying wireless networking solutions in an industrial setting. Additional points can be awarded easily in an incremental manner. The wireless system can also integrate with legacy systems without any issues. 
  4. Operational Efficiencies - Migrating to wireless networking can help in improving operational efficiencies as well. Plant managers can troubleshoot and diagnose issues more easily. The system facilitates predictive maintenance by allowing the monitoring of remote assets. 
  5. Human Safety - Another critical factor that should influence the decision to migrate to wireless networking is the human safety factor. Wireless technologies allow safer operations, reducing exposure to harmful environments. For instance, a wireless system can be used in taking a reading and adjusting valves without having to go to the problematic area to take measurements. With wireless networking systems, readings can be taken more frequently that can help in early detection and reduction of possible incidents. 
  6. Efficient Information Transfer - Another advantage is that the time required to reach a device is reduced. This results in a more efficient transfer of information between network segments that are geographically separated. The industry wireless networking standards use IP addresses to allow remote access to data from field devices. 

For more information on wireless technologies in industrial settings, contact Miller Energy by visiting https://millerenergy.com or by calling 800-631-5454.

Selecting the Right Magnetic Level Indicator

Companies in the process industry need the ability to visually monitor liquid levels in vessels (boilers, storage tanks, separators, etc.). Traditionally, armored glass sight gauges have been used. However, many companies want an alternative to sight gauges to avoid problems such as breakage, leaks, or bursting at high pressures and temperatures. In addition, the visibility of the sight glass can be poor and often affected by moisture, corrosion, or oxidation.

Many companies are increasing the use of automation and desire a 4–20 mA, HART®, FOUNDATION® fieldbus, or other output for level—which is difficult to do with a sight glass. Magnetic level indicators (MLIs) do not have the shortcomings of glass sight gauges and are suitable for a wide variety of applications.

Orion Instruments, a Magnetrol company, has authored an excellent Magnetic Level Indicator selection guide.


Miller Energy, Inc.
https://millerenergy.com
In NY/NJ 800-631-5454
In Eastern PA 888-631-5454

Understanding How Flame Arresters Work


Flame Arrester
A Flame Arrester (or arrestor) is a passive devices with no moving parts, that allows hot gas to pass through, but stops a flame in order to prevent a larger fire or explosion.  Flame Arresters uses a wound metal ribbon type element that prevents the spread of flame from the exposed side of the arrester to the protected side of the arrester. The metal element's construction provides a matrix of engineered openings that are carefully calculated and sized to quench the flame by absorbing the flame's heat. As an explosion flame travels through a narrow metal space, heat is transmitted to the walls, energy is lost and only vapor gasses are able to pass through. Flame Arresters are used in many industries chemical, petrochemical, pulp and paper, refining, pharmaceutical, mining, power generation, and wastewater treatment.

Cashco Flame Arresters are specifically engineered to match the explosive mixtures Maximum Experimental Safe Gap, in order to ensure complete extinction of the flame. At the heart of each Cashco flame arrestor lies filter discs that consists of wound, smooth and channeled strips of stainless steel set at specific maximum experimental stage gaps the smaller the gaps are which the flame travels the more heat and energy is lost therefore the filters gap width and gap length are specifically engineered to match the explosive mixture in order to ensure complete extinction of the flame. 

To learn more about Cashco flame arrestors, contact Miller Energy, Inc. by calling 908-755-6700 or by visiting https://millerenergy.com.


The Yokogawa 4-Wire SENCOM™ SMART Sensor Platform

Analyzer FLXA402
Multi-Channel/Parameter Analyzer FLXA402
The SENCOM SMART Sensor Platform has been designed with a strong focus on Yokogawa's digital SMART sensors and provides greater insight and enhanced capabilities for more reliable data across the entire product lifetime.

Yokogawa's latest SMART sensor system enhances the operation, reliability, and credibility of online process analyzers, from the engineering and purchasing to modification and optimization, by using the latest sensing technologies and asset management tools.

The SENCOM SMART Sensor Platform has been designed with a strong focus on Yokogawa's digital SMART sensors and provides greater insight and enhanced capabilities for more reliable data across the entire product lifetime.

Digital SMART SENCOM™ Adapter, SA11
Digital SMART SENCOM™ Adapter, SA11
Yokogawa's latest SMART sensor system enhances the operation, reliability, and credibility of online process analyzers, from the engineering and purchasing to modification and optimization, by using the latest sensing technologies and asset management tools.

Simple Setup and Configuration

Analog sensors equipped with a Variopin connector and Yokogawa ID chip
Analog sensors
The SENCOM 4.0 Platform is designed with an intuitive menu structure, easy-to-understand configuration, alarm settings, and clear error-fixing information to help you make credible and reliable measurements of online process control.

Environmentally Friendly Design

Conventional SMART sensors include integrated electronics on top of an analog sensor, therefore the still operating electronics must be thrown away once the sensor has reachable the end of its lifetime, adding to global waste.

The SENCOM 4.0 platform includes a reusable SMART adapter, so only an analog sensor has to be removed when it reaches the end of its lifetime, thereby reducing waste and costs.

Easy and Efficient Maintenance

Optional Digital SMART SENCOM™ Expansion Junction Box, BA11
Optional Digital SMART SENCOM™
Expansion Junction Box, BA11
The Maintenance Manager is a data management system that allows technicians to forecast maintenance and calibration frequency, estimate the service life of the sensor, and estimate the life expectancy of the sensor.

Calibration data are stored within the memory chip of the SMART sensor using the SENCOM 4.0platform. Once the sensor is connected to the analyzer, it is possible to download or upload the latest calibration data to the FLXA402 analyzer, thus avoiding the need for field calibration.

For more information, visit this page on the Miller Energy website.

Miller Energy, Inc.
800-631-5454

Level Instruments for Tank Overfill Protection

Tank overfill incidents in recent years have resulted in loss of life and billions of dollars in damages to petroleum facilities worldwide. One of the worst incidents - the overflow of a gasoline storage tank at Buncefield Oil Depot (U.K.) - has been traced to the failure of level control to maintain containment of the flammable liquid. More common are minor spills that cause significant environmental impact and result in millions of dollars in clean-up fees and environmental agency fines.

In the wake of this incident, the American Petroleum Institute’s (API) Recommended Practice (RP) 2350, the most widely accepted guideline for overfill protection of petroleum storage tanks, has been revised. The fourth edition was published in May 2012 and combined the prescriptive standards of RP 2350 with the functional safety standards of Safety Instrumented Systems (SIS) as described in IEC 61511.

Vital to these new requirements is the application of level instrumentation as one part of a comprehensive Overfill Prevention Process (OPP).

Magnetrol, a world-leader in the design, manufacturer and application of level and flow instrumentation, has written an application document titled "Level Instruments for Tank Overfill Protection". Get your copy here.

The Yokogawa YS1700 Single Loop Controller Replaces Obsolete Moore/Siemens 353

Yokogawa YS1700

Now that entire Moore/Siemens 350 family is obsolete, are you considering upgrading to a DCS? 


Are you concerned about the cost and time for a new installation, application development and personnel training?

Is it possible that the new equipment vendor may again leave you stranded with their equipment as their core business is not industrial automation and control?

We have a better solution for you: Yokogawa and its YS1700 PID loop controller. Yokogawa has been providing industrial solutions, as their primary business, for over a century and their YS1700 will keep you off of eBay looking for spare 353 parts.

The Magnetrol ECHOTEL 962 Dual Ultrasonic Level Control


The Magnetrol ECHOTEL Model 962 is a dual point switch that can be used as a level controller, or to control pumps in an auto fill or auto empty mode. The tip sensitive lower gap performs well in aerated or foamy liquids, and can measure to within 1.4" of the vessel bottom. The rigidity of the unique flow-through upper gap allows separations of up to 125" (318 cm) between the upper and lower transducer gaps.

The Magnetrol ECHOTEL 962 offers the ultimate solution to reliable dual point liquid level measurement. This advanced switch uses pulsed signal technology for superior performance in difficult process conditions, and to provide excellent immunity from sources of electrical noise interference. Extensive self-testing of the electronics and transducer make this advanced switch suitable for use in Safety Integrity Level (SIL) 2 loops.

The ECHOTEL Model 962 is equipped with advanced diagnostics that continuously check the sensor and electronics. The diagnostics also alarm for electrical noise interference from external sources.

Ultrasonic contact switches use a pair of piezoelectric crystals that are encapsulated in epoxy at the tip of the transducer for level measurement. The crystals are made of a ceramic material that vibrates at a given frequency when subjected to an applied voltage. The transmit crystal converts the applied voltage from the electronics into an ultrasonic signal. When liquid is present in the gap, the receive crystal senses the ultrasonic signal from the transmit crystal and converts it back to an electrical signal.

Miller Energy, Inc.
https://millerenergy.com
800-631-5454

ASCO Express Product Catalog

The ASCO Express program features a range of flow control products and accessories available for shipment the same day you order them. The products listed in this catalog provide the performance required for a variety of system and process applications including boiler, air handling, process control, and water and steam control. The control voltages available for each product are the primary voltages used in industrial and commercial applications today.

908-755-6700

Water and Wastewater Treatment Applications for the Magnetrol R82 Pulse Burst Radar Transmitters


The Magnetrol R82 Pulse Burst Radar transmitter performs across a wide range of applications. The R82 is designed to provide radar reliable process measurement in challenging, vapor saturated environments, at the cost of what you pay for an ultrasonic device. For water treatment, the Magnetrol R82 Pulse Burst Radar transmitter provides continuous level measurement at the lift station and coagulant feed tanks, in settling tanks during clarification, in polymer, filter, and lime slurry tanks during filtration, and for open atmosphere water reservoirs where the control technology must withstand punishing weather conditions.  In wastewater facilities, the R82 radar can control level at the lift station pump, open channel flow and screening system, monitor feed tanks containing chemical coagulants oxidants and phosphorous precipitation, measure splitter box in clarifier levels, control corrosion inhibitors, manage pH adjustment, mixed liquor and secondary clarifier levels, as well as activated sludge and digester level control.

Miller Energy, Inc.
https://millerenergy.com

Temperature Switches

temperature switch
Temperature switch
(United Electric Controls)
A temperature switch detects the temperature of some substance. Temperature switches often use bimetallic strips as the temperature-sensing element, the motion of which actuates one or more switch contacts. An alternative design uses a metal bulb filled with a fluid that expands with temperature, causing the switch mechanism to actuate based on the pressure this fluid exerts against a diaphragm or bellows. This latter temperature switch design is really a pressure switch, whose pressure is a direct function of process temperature by virtue of the physics of the entrapped fluid inside the sensing bulb.

The “normal” status of a switch is the resting condition of no stimulation. A temperature switch will be in its “normal” status when it senses minimum temperature (i.e. cold, in some cases a condition colder than ambient). For a temperature switch, “normal” status is any sensed temperature below the trip threshold of the switch.

switch contacts

Like all other process switches, temperature switches exhibit a certain amount of deadband in their switching action. A temperature switch that trips at 300 F rising, for example, will not reset at 300 F falling. That switch would more likely reset at some lower temperature such as 295 F. With mechanical switch designs, some amount of deadband is inevitable due to friction inside the mechanism. However, process switch deadband is actually a useful characteristic as it helps avoid repeated “nuisance” alarms from happening.

To understand this concept, it is helpful to imagine a scenario where the process variable is at or very near the trip point. For our hypothetical temperature switch with a trip point of 300 F (rising), imagine a situation where the process temperature is precisely 300.0 F. Any further rise in temperature will of course trip the switch (sounding an alarm). With no deadband, however, the switch will immediately re-set when the temperature falls back down to 300.0 F. This means the switch may possibly “cycle” back and forth between its trip and reset states with just a minute change in process temperature (300.0 F to 300.1 F and back again). If the temperature switch is activating an alarm every time it trips, it will create a series of alarm events prompting operators to repeatedly acknowledge the alarm. This is a nuisance to operations personnel, as it distracts them from addressing what they already realize is a process problem. It is better for the switch to trip at 300.0 F rising and remain in that tripped state until the temperature falls down to some degree substantially below the trip point. This way, the operators only receive one alarm event rather than multiple alarm events for each process temperature excursion.

Some mechanical temperature switches come equipped with a separate adjustment for deadband (also called differential). Setting this deadband adjustment in a mechanical temperature switch requires the technician to repeatedly subject the sensing element to a rising and falling temperature, to check that the switch trips at the proper setting and resets at the proper setting. This is analogous to cycling the process variable back and forth when adjusting the “zero” and “span” settings of an analog transmitter: checking to see that the transmitter repeatedly outputs a 0% signal at the lower range value (LRV) and a 100% signal at the upper range value (URV). 

For discrete temperature-sensing applications demanding high accuracy and repeatability, electronic temperature switch circuits using thermocouples, RTDs, or thermistors may be used instead of a mechanical (bi-metallic or filled bulb) sensing element. The operation and configuration of discrete electronic temperature switches is very similar to that of continuous electronic temperature transmitters.

An example of an electronic temperature switch module is the United Electric One Series shown below:

UE Series One Electronic Temperature Switch
UE Series One Electronic Temperature Switch

With electronic temperature switches, the adjustment of deadband (differential) is both precise and flexible. Unlike mechanical switches where deadband is primarily a function of friction, and therefore liable to change over time as the device wears, electronic switching circuits may be precisely set for any trip and reset points along its measurement range, remaining very stable over time.

For more information about temperature switches, contact Miller Energy by visiting https://millerenergy.com or by calling 908-755-6700.


Text adapted from "Lessons In Industrial Instrumentation" by Tony R. Kuphaldt – under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License.