Showing posts with label Metro New York. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Metro New York. Show all posts

Selecting Variable Area Flow Meters for Process Flow Measurement

Variable Area Flow Meters

Many industrial processes involve the movement of fluid product components, either liquid or gaseous, through pipes. Because processing is about control, an input to the facility's management, measurement, or data logging centers will answer the query, "How much is going through that pipe?" 

In the industrial process measurement and control industry, there are several ways for quantifying flow, each with unique characteristics that may be useful under certain operating situations. All flow measuring methods are indirect because the actual measurement is of a character influenced predictably by a change in the media flow. Flow measurement is a critical component that, when paired with other fluid properties, is used to calculate the total mass of a fluid passing through the measurement site. 

The variable area meter, commonly known as a rotameter and VA meter, is a tried and true flow measuring device that operates by creating an equilibrium between an upward force created by fluid motion and a downward force, gravity. A tapering glass or metal tube encases a specifically shaped float, also known as a shaped weight, in the device. VA meters must be positioned vertically, with the media flowing upward from the bottom, so that the gravity force required for functioning is correctly aligned with the flow direction. As fluid flows upward via the precisely tapered tube, drag is created on the float enclosed within the tube, pulling it upward. As the float rises, the open space between the float and the tube wall expands, causing the fluid velocity and drag force to decrease. The flow velocity within the tube will cause the weight to climb for any given flow volume until the drag force generated by the flow reaches equilibrium with the countervailing power of gravity on the float. The tube and float are well designed, allowing for an immediate indication of flow volume.

Variable area flowmeters have the following operating characteristics: 

  • There is no need for external power or fuel for functioning. 
  • Vertical installation is required, with flow arriving at the bottom. 
  • Meters are calibrated to a given chemical and temperature. 
  • The operation is stable and has a modest pressure drop. 
  • For operation, constant gravity is required. 
  • Flow rate can be read locally using a meter or a scale inscribed on the tube. 
  • The visibility of the float through the medium is required for unit flow readings using glass tubes. 
  • For industrial flow metering equipment, accuracy is relatively low. 
  • Inexpensive upkeep, simple construction, and low comparative cost.

Brooks Instrument, a world-renowned maker of flow, pressure, and level measurement equipment, created a brief paper highlighting the parameters to consider when specifying a VA meter and how each aspect influences the unit's performance. The description is realistic and straightforward to grasp. It is suggested reading for all process stakeholders who want to improve their flow measuring skills.

For more information about variable area flow meters contact Miller Energy. Call 800-631-5454 or visit https://millerenergy.com.

Process Refractometers for Water Treatment Chemical Concentration Monitoring

Process Refractometers for Water Treatment


INTRODUCTION


Pure water treatment removes undesirable chemicals, biological contaminants, suspended solids, and gases from raw water. Water purification aims to produce water for a specific purpose, such as human consumption and medical or industrial use.


Polyaluminium coagulants are increasing use in potable water treatment plants, particularly for soft, colored surface waters. Polyaluminium chloride (PACl) is gradually replacing Alum (aluminum sulfate), a commonly used coagulant in water treatment plants. Alum coagulates at a limited pH range (between 5.5 and 6.5) and often requires alkali to the raw water to achieve the optimum coagulation pH. Furthermore, the alum floc produced is particularly fragile, which is vital if a coagulant is required to maximize color removal in a microfiltration-based water treatment process.


K-Patents Teflon Body Refractometer PR-23-M from Miller Energy, Inc.


APPLICATION


Water treatment by chemical precipitation is a complex process. It starts with adding flocculants, specifically, Polyaluminium Chloride (PACl) and Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH). PACl is a synthetic polymer dissolved in water. It precipitates in big volumetric flocs, which absorb suspended pollutants in the raw water. The turbidity of the raw water defines Polyaluminium Chloride quantity. PACl concentration must be higher than 10 % To keep the flocculation process smooth. Polyaluminium Chloride is stable in the storage tank; however, it tends to crystallize after some time. Vaisala K-PATENTS® refractometer monitors the concentration of PACl to inform about the need for tank or pipe cleaning, thus preventing blockage caused by the PACl crystals.


NaOH regulates pH level, increases alkalinity, and neutralizes acids in the water. In alkaline water, the coagulation and flocculation processes work more effectively. Moreover, sufficient alkalinity prevents dissolving the lead from pipes and pipe fittings and reduces the corrosive effect of the water to iron pipes.


Further, particles suspended in water start to precipitate and agglomerate to form larger particles, known as flocs. The flocs are then settled at the bottom, forming sludge, and then removed from the process. After separating most of the floc, the remaining suspended particles and unsettled floc get filtered to remove water.


In the filtration phase, the water goes through the layers of anthracite, sand, and gravel. As a result, organic compounds contributing to taste and odor get removed. Other remaining particles get trapped by adhering to the sand and gravel particles.


After harmful micro-organisms get removed through filtering, it is necessary to add disinfecting chemicals to the water to inactivate any remaining pathogens and potentially harmful micro-organisms. One of the disinfecting chemicals used is Sodium Hypochlorite (NaOCl). When dissolved in water, this chemical releases chlorine, which is an efficient and safe disinfectant if added in a sufficient amount. Apart from sodium hypochlorite, liquid chlorine and chlorine dioxide are also choices as disinfectants.


Fluoride may also be added to the water to reduce tooth decay and prevent chronic diseases. However, fluoride in the water must not exceed recommended levels. Excessive levels of fluoride can be toxic or cause undesirable cosmetic effects such as staining of teeth.


Sodium Hypochlorite is unstable and quickly decomposes. The stability of NaOCl solution is dependent on the following factors:


  • Hypochlorite concentration
  • The temperature of the solution
  • PH value of the solution
  • The concentration of the impurities during catalyzing decomposition
  • Exposure to light


With the process refractometer, it is possible to monitor NaOCl concentration and control the disinfection conditions.


The water purification disinfection stage happens in the disinfectant basin. Then, corrosion control assures the high quality of the purified water. Finally, the pure water gets stored for further consumption.


INSTRUMENTATION AND INSTALLATION


Vaisala K-PATENTS® Teflon Body Refractometer PR-23-M provides in-line measurements of Polyaluminium Chloride and Sodium Hydroxide at the initial stage of purification, ensuring the efficient flocculation of undesired particles. In addition, through the measurement of Sodium Hypochlorite and Fluoride at the water disinfection stage, high-quality purified water at the outlet is assured.


Refractometer installations happen in three different points in a by-pass loop between each chemical tank pump outlet and the treatment point. The refractometer allows monitoring the chemicals concentration at the exit from the storage tank to the pipe treatment point.


Typical measurement ranges are:

  • PACl is ca. 10-11 %
  • NaOH is ca. 40-45 %
  • NaOCl is ca. 8-12 %

Miller Energy, Inc.
https://millerenergy.com
800-631-5454

Cashco Sanitary / Hygienic Regulators and Control Valves

Cashco manufactures a broad line of throttling rotary and linear control valves, pressure reducing regulators, and back pressure regulators used in pharmaceutical, biopharma, life science, food & beverage, cosmetic, and semiconductor industries. 

Cashco sanitary/hygienic products include: 

Sanitary Reducing Regulators 

Model C-CS, Model C-PRV, CA1/SA1, CA4/SA4, Model 5381, Model P1, Model P2 Model P3, Model P4, Model P5, Model PA1/PL1 

Sanitary Back Pressure Regulators 

Model C-BPV, Model 3171, Model CA5/SA5, Model BA1/BL1, Model B2 

Sanitary Control Valves 

Model SCV-30, Model SCV-S 

Controllers 

Model 764P-37 

Sanitary Blanketing Valve 

Model 1088, Model 1088-BP, Model 1100 

For more information about Cashco Sanitary / Hygienic Products, contact Miller Energy. Call them at 800-631-5454 or visit their website at https://millerenergy.com​.

United Electric Controls 12 Series Pressure and Temperature Switches

United Electric Controls 12 Series Pressure and Temperature Switches

SIL 2 Certified, vibration-resistant, 316 stainless steel pressure, differential pressure and temperature switches.

The United Electric Controls 12 Series hazardous location switches are suitable for challenging applications where space is limited. Snap-action Belleville spring assemblies provide vibration resistance and extended switching life. The 316 stainless steel enclosure and the hermetically sealed switch provide robust environmental protection. Approved for use in hazardous environments, the 12 Series outperforms the competition in applications ranging from refineries to chemical plants, rotating machinery, and more.


In New York Metro and Northern NJ
Phone: 800-631-5454

In Eastern Pennsylvania and Delaware:
Phone: 610-363-6200

https://millerenergy.com

The Thermo Scientific™ Prima PRO Online Mass Spectrometer & Process Gas Analyzer

The Thermo Scientific™ Prima PRO online mass spectrometer & process gas analyzer meets many challenging process applications in the petrochemical, iron, and steel, and biotechnology industries. The Prima PRO online mass spectrometer delivers faster, more complete, and highly reliable lab-quality online gas composition analysis. It features a rugged, fault-tolerant design that ensures availability that exceeds 99.7%, a simplified maintenance procedure, and an auto-tune capability to facilitate ongoing operation and enhance productivity.

For more information about the Thermo Scientific™ Prima PRO in Metro New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Northern Ohio, contact Miller Energy, Inc.  Call them at 800-631-5454 or visit their website at https://millerenergy.com.

Sliding Gate Control Valves from Schubert & Salzer


Schubert & Salzer's sliding gate control valves are designed as an effective alternative to traditional control valves. The sliding gate valve controls liquid, vapor, and gaseous media precisely, quickly, and economically. The design is uniquely simple, but is intelligently built to handle complex applications that require precise control under taxing conditions. They are an excellent choice for a variety of media, including steam, liquids, and gases.

Sliding Gate Control Valve Operation

A sealing plate with many crossways slots of equal height is fixed in the body at right angles to the flow direction. A moving disc with the same slot arrangement moves in parallel to the fixed disc, thereby changing the flow cross-section. The prevailing differential pressure presses the moving disc against the fixed disc and seals it. 

The machined orifices in the fixed plate or disc can vary in design, size, and configuration, determining the flow coefficient (Cv) and the flow characteristic of the valve. As the cross sectional area changes and the valve modulates, flow is broken apart, creating a variable field of area flow, which reduces energy and noise. The differential pressure creates a unique seal between the two plates, and when in the sealed position, an overlap of approximately 1 mm creates a leak-tight valve.

ADVANTAGES OF THE SLIDING GATE CONTROL VALVE

  • Fits into tight spaces
  • Outstanding rangeability
  • 40:1 to 160:1
  • Easy to install and maintain
  • Variable Cv Values
  • Significantly reduced energy consumption
  • Minimal wear
  • Extremely low leakage rate
  • Optimal flow control
  • Maximum differential pressures

For more information about Schubert & Salzer products contact Miller Energy, Inc. Call them at 800-631-5454 or visit their website at https://millerenergy.com.

The Vaisala K-PATENTS PR-43A Sanitary Process Refractometers for Food, Beverage & Dairy Industries

Vaisala K-PATENTS® Sanitary Process Refractometers PR-43-AC for hygienic installations in small pipe line sizes of 2.5 inch and smaller; PR-43-AP for hygienic installations in large pipes, tanks, cookers, crystallizers and kettles and for higher temperatures up to 150°C (300 °F); and the PR-43-APT for flush mounting installations in cookers, cooling crystallizers and other vessels that have scrapers or mixers.

Sanitary Refractometer Applications:

Extraction, evaporation, brewing, distilling, sugar dissolving, blending, filling. Alcohol, rum, whiskey, brandy, vodka, molasses, liquors, cider, alcoholic beverages, pre-mixed liquors. Beer and malt beverages, wort, cut beer, root beer. Juices, blended vegetable and fruit juices and nectars, still drinks, vegetable and juice concentrates, iced tea and coffee, instant coffee and tea. Soft drinks, energy and sport drinks, beverage base. Wines, grape must.

Sanitary Refractometer 3A Approval:

The Sanitary refractometer PR-43-A is Sanitary 3-A approved to meet the highest hygiene requirements of food production. The 3-A Symbol assures that the Sanitary Refractometer

PR-43-A conforms to 3-A Sanitary Standard Number 46-04 for Refractometers and Energy-Absorbing Optical Sensors for Milk and Milk Products and it has passed the independent Third Party Verification inspection for 3-A Symbol authorization.

For more information about Vaisala K-PATENTS products in Metro New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Northern Ohio contact Miller Energy, Inc. Call them at 800-631-5454 or visit their web site at https://millerenergy.com.

Yokogawa Boiler Controls Used on USNS Mercy


On the United States Navy Hospital Ship Mercy, Yokogawa's Indicating Controllers are used to control two Foster Wheeler boilers supplying steam to 2 GE turbines to generate 18.3 MW of power.

Miller Energy, Inc.
https://millerenergy.com

The Magnetrol Eclipse 700 Guided Wave Radar (GWR) Transmitter


The Magnetrol Eclipse® Model 700 GWR is designed with the chemical processing industry in mind. It gives you the performance and durability you need to address your biggest challenges in a streamlined, versatile configuration cost-effective enough to use in a variety of common applications.

The Eclipse® 700 is a guided wave radar (GWR) transmitter that easily handles challenging situations as well as common chemical processing applications. Its streamlined configuration gives you the features you want and the diagnostics you need, at the price point you expect.

Versatile – Able to be used in a broad range of chemical processing applications

Robust – Stands up to challenging conditions like foaming, interface, and high pressure or harsh conditions

Superior SNR – Strong signal strength is ideal for low dielectric media

Reliable – True Level Measure provides industry-leading accuracy along the entire probe length

Overfill-Safe Operation – Only Eclipse transmitters are available with overfill-capable probes

Proactive Diagnostics – Saves echo curves and offers troubleshooting tips when a problem occurs

For more information, contact Miller Energy, Inc. Call them at 800-631-5454 or visit their website at https://millerenergy.com.

Upcoming Yokogawa "Back to Basics" Process Control Webinar Series

Now is the time to use your time productively!  Yokogawa's "Back to Basics" webinar series provides you a great resource to learn and review different measurement technologies. These online webinars discuss recommended practices, application selection and sizing, and how to avoid common pitfalls. Gain insight directly from the experts!


Yokogawa Back to Basics Series:




"Attaining Proficiency in Industrial Pressure Measurement "

Online Webinar
Thursday, April 9, 2020
11:00 AM Eastern / 8:00 AM Pacific

This webinar reviews the basic principles of measuring pressure and key considerations when selecting pressure transmitters for various applications.

This webinar will discuss:
  • The basic physics of pressure
  • Types of pressure sensors
  • Communication standards
  • Sensor technology considerations
  • Calibration and maintenance best practices



"Fundamentals of Fabulous Flow Measurement"

Online Webinar
Thursday, April 16, 2020
11:00 AM Eastern / 8:00 AM Pacific

This webinar will explore the fundamentals of flow measurement technologies and how they stack up in different applications.

In this webinar you:
  • Review the theory behind flow measurement technologies
  • Discuss common flow application challenges
  • Evaluate the different technologies when selecting a flow meter
  • Illustrate installation practices for successful measurements



"Magical Mystery Tour of High Purity pH Measurement"

Online Webinar
Thursday, April 23rd, 2020
8:00 AM Pacific / 11:00 AM Eastern

The presentation will explore the theory of pH and how it can be successfully applied in high purity applications, discuss both standard and solution temperature compensation, review installation requirements, and illustrate good calibration and maintenance procedures to facilitate satisfactory measurements.

In this webinar we:
  • Review the theory behind the measurement of pH
  • Discuss the issues surrounding high purity pH measurements
  • Illustrate the difference between standard and solution temperature compensation
  • Assess installation requirements for successful measurements
  • Clarify good calibration and maintenance procedures



"Vibrating Element Technology for Gas Density, Specific Gravity, and Hydrogen"

Online Webinar
Thursday, April 30, 2020
8:00 AM Pacific / 11:00 AM Eastern

This presentation goes over the theory behind vibrating element technology and explores some of the applications in which it can be used.

In this webinar you will review:
  • The theory behind density and vibrating element technology
  • The importance of using compensated density
  • How to clean the detector


"Digitally Transform your Plant with Field Wireless and IIOT"

Online Webinar
Thursday, May 7, 2020
11:00 AM Eastern / 8:00 AM Pacific

Wireless sensor networks can provide reliable and secure communications for applications including control, monitoring, safety, and reliability. Regardless of the application, wireless technology has opened the door for companies to pursue improvements that may have been impossible or uneconomical in the past. However, adopting a wireless strategy is more than just throwing a few radios out into the plant. A little planning can go a long way to ensure your future success.

Topics covered include:
  • Where you would use Field Wireless vs IIoT
  • The fundamentals of wireless sensor networks
  • Applications that illustrate how a wireless strategy can transform your operations, improve reliability, and increase safety



White Paper: Using Digital MFC Capabilities to Improve Bioprocessing Results Miller Energy

Biomanufacturing relies on numerous pieces of equipment working in concert to produce life-altering therapeutics. The equipment relies on various subsystems to achieve the desired results. In a bioreactor, one of the most essential subsystems provides gas management for the gases necessary for cellular metabolism. At the heart of the gas management subsystem is the thermal mass flow controller (MFC), a component that precisely measures and controls the delivery of gases to the bioprocess.

This white paper, courtesy of Brooks Instrument, discusses mass flow controller data capabilities in relation to a broader biomanufacturing capital asset management.


For more information on Brooks Instrument products, contact Miller Energy. Call them at 800-631-5454 or visit their website at https://millerenergy.com.

Programming the UE One Series Hybrid Transmitter-Switches


The United Electric Controls One Series electronic pressure and temperature transmitter-switches are designed to provide transmitter, switch and gauge functions all-in-one rugged enclosure that can withstand the rigors of harsh and hazardous environments. Available in Type 4X enclosures approved for intrinsic safety, flameproof and non-incendive area classifications, these hybrid transmitter-switches have a fully adjustable set point and deadband and 0.1% repeatability. This video provides a quick tutorial on how to set up the One Series.

For more information, contact Miller Energy. Call them at 800-631-5454 or visit their web site at https://millerenergy.com.

Don’t Let Valves Come Between You and Accurate Flow Measurement

Getting valves and flow meters to work together is sometimes a challenging task within industrial water and wastewater applications. Valves tend to create the kind of irregular media flow patterns in pipelines that make it a real challenge to achieve accurate flow measurement of liquids, gas or steam. That’s why many types of popular liquid flow meters require straight pipe runs.

Unfortunately, the nature of the process or the kind of space required for long straight runs of pipe is often an impossible luxury in many of today’s plants.



How Valves Create Flow Disturbances


Depending on a pipeline’s flowing media (liquid, gas or steam), the process pressures and the process temperatures, the fluid flow dynamics within a pipeline can vary widely. The ideal pipeline configuration for the accurate measurement of flow with nearly all of the industry’s most popular flow sensors is a straight pipe with consistent media conditions Many processes by their very nature, however, tend to be unstable and create irregular flows within a pipeline all by themselves.

Plant layouts, especially expansions and retrofits, also tend to create less than optimum pipeline conditions for the measurement of flow. The addition of valves, pumps, elbows and other equipment into the pipeline create media swirling and other effects that can result in irregular flow profiles that will reduce flow meter measurement accuracy and repeatability. That’s why many flow meter manufacturers recommend anywhere from 5 to 10 or even 20 to 30 pipe diameters of straight pipe run upstream and downstream of the flow meter—depending on the flow sensing technology in use.

Flow Straightening and Conditioning


While the simple solution is to know your flow meter and its straight pipe run requirements to achieve accurate, consistent measurement, this is often easier said than done. Today’s complex and ever changing industrial processes, the need to treat and conserve water, crowded plant environments where real estate is precious, regulatory requirements and the team involved in running any plant can mean that your valve or elbow inevitably intrudes on your flow meter’s turf. Many times the first sign of the problem is when the flow meter isn’t reading the flow accurately. By then changing the pipeline layout or moving other devices such as valves is impractical and too costly.

Flow straighteners and conditioners offer an answer to this problem. There are several different types of flow straighteners and conditioners, including perforated plates, tube bundles, etc. The purpose of all flow straighteners and conditioners is to eliminate swirl and provide a stable velocity flow profile. Of course the ideal time to think about flow conditioning is before the flow meter is installed so that the flow conditioner and flow meter can be calibrated to work together. One drawback to add-on flow conditioners and straighteners is that they increase head loss.

Flow Meters With Built-In Conditioning


Another solution to consider is the installation of a flow meter with built-in flow conditioning. This type of solution offers the advantages of installation flexibility, reduced equipment, simplified installation with potentially fewer pipe penetrations and reduced maintenance requirements. Several manufacturers offer flow meters that include built-in flow conditioning. For example, McCrometer’s V-Cone Flow Meter is a differential-pressure sensing meter with integral flow conditioning that operates within liquids, gas or steam.

McCrometer’s V-Cone Flow Meter
McCrometer’s V-Cone Flow Meter
The V-Cone’s DP flow sensor conditions fluid flow to provide a stable flow profile that increases accuracy. The flow sensor‘s design features a centrally-located cone inside a tube. The cone interacts with the fluid flow and reshapes the velocity profile to create a lower pressure region immediately downstream. The pressure difference, which is exhibited between the static line pressure and the low pressure created downstream of the cone, can be measured via two pressure sensing taps. One tap is placed slightly upstream of the cone and the other is located in the downstream face of the cone itself. The pressure difference can then be incorporated into a derivation of the Bernoulli equation to determine the fluid flow rate.

The cone’s central position in the line optimizes the velocity of the liquid flow at the point of measurement. It forms very short vortices as the flow passes the cone. These short vortices create a low amplitude, high frequency signal for excellent signal stability. The result is a highly stable flow profile for measurement accuracy to +0.5% with +0.1% repeatability over a wide flow range of 10:1. All of this is possible with a minimal straight pipe run of 0 to 3 diameters upstream and 0 to 1 diameters downstream from the flow meter depending upon placement from valves and other control devices.

Conclusions


Getting accurate flow measurement with valves, pumps, and other equipment in relatively close proximity is difficult, but achievable. The ideal way to achieve accurate and repeatable flow measurement within industrial water and wastewater applications is to recognize in advance the straight pipe run requirements of the flow sensing technology in use at your plant. When the process, the plant layout or other factors lead to swirl in your pipeline that affects meter performance, then consider either flow conditioners or a flow meter with built-in flow conditioning.

Attribution: Original white paper written by Jim Panek, Product Manager, Water & Wastewater, McCrometer, Inc.

Tutorial: The Yokogawa SMARTDAC+ GX/GP Paperless Recorder Channel Settings


The Yokogawa SMARTDAC+ GX and GP are fully integrated measurement, display, and recording platforms equipped with an advanced touch screen operator interface. GX series is a panel-mount design, capable of operating in harsh industrial applications and environments. GP is the portable version of the GX, intended for use in lab and test bench applications.

This video is a tutorial to learn the display settings available within the SmartDAC+  GX/GP's analog input, digital input, digital output, math, and communication channel settings.

For more information about the Yokogawa SMARTDAC+ GX/GP Paperless Recorder contact Miller Energy, Inc. Call them at 800-631-5454 or visit their web site at https://millerenergy.com.

Magnetrol Model A15 Single-Stage Displacer Level Control Switches


Displacer switch operation is based upon simple buoyancy, whereby a spring is loaded with weighted displacers, which are heavier than the liquid. Immersion of the displacers in the liquid results in buoyancy force change, changing the net force acting on the spring. The spring compresses as the buoyancy force increases.

A magnetic sleeve is connected to the spring and operates within a non-magnetic barrier tube. Spring movement causes the magnetic sleeve to move into the field of a pivoted magnet, actuating a switch mechanism located outside the barrier tube. Built-in limit stops prevent over stroking of the spring, under level surge conditions.

The minimum differential band is approximately 6 inches (152 mm) in water and varies somewhat with liquid specific gravity. The maximum differential is determined by the length of the displacer suspension cable. Series A15 units are calibrated to operate over a narrow level differential band and are ideally suited for liquid level alarm applications on either high or low level.

For more information about Magnetrol Displacer Level Switches, contact Miller Energy, Inc. Call them at 800-631-5454 or visit their web site at https://millerenergy.com.

Control Valve Glossary

Reprinted with permission of Cashco.
Linear Control Valve Design
Click for larger view.
Actuator: An actuator is a pneumatic hydraulic, or electrically powered device which supplies force and motion to open or close a valve.

Airset: A regulator which is used to control the supply pressure to the valve actuator and its auxiliaries.

Angle valve: A valve design in which one port is collinear with the valve stem or actuator, and the other port is at a right angle to the valve stem.

Anti-cavitation trim: See “trim, anti-cavitation”. Anti-noise trim: See “trim, anti-noise”.

Bellows stem seal: A thin wall, convoluted, flexible component that makes a seal between the stem and bonnet or body and allows stem motion while maintaining a hermetic seal.

Benchset: The calibration of the actuator spring range of a control valve, to account for the in service process forces.

Body: The main pressure boundary of the valve that also provides the pipe connecting ends, the fluid flow passageway, and supports the seating surfaces and the valve closure member.

Bonnet: The portion of the valve that contains the packing box and stem seal and may guide the stem. It may also provide the principal opening to the body cavity for assembly of internal parts or be an integral part of the valve body. It may also provide for the attachment of the actuator to the valve body. Typical bonnets are bolted, threaded, welded to, pressure-sealed, or integral with the body.

Butterfly valve: A valve with a circular body and a rotary motion disk closure member, pivotally supported by its shaft.

Rotary Control Valve Design
Click for larger view.
Cage: A part of a valve trim that surrounds the closure member and may provide flowcharacterization and/ or a seating surface. It may also provide stability, guiding, balance, and alignment, and facilitate assembly of other parts of the valve trim.

Capacity: The rate of flow through a valve under stated conditions.

Cavitation: A two-stage phenomenon of liquid flow. The first stage is the formation of vapor bubbles
within liquid system due to static pressure of fluid at vena contracta falling below the fluid vapor pressure; the second stage is the collapse or implosion of these cavities back into an all-liquid state as the fluid decelerates and static pressure is recovered.

Characteristic, flow: An indefinite term, see “characteristic, inherent flow” and “characteristic, installed flow.”

Characteristic, equal percentage: An inherent flow characteristic which, for equal increments of rated travel, will ideally give equal percentage changes of the existing flow coefficient (cv).

Characteristic, inherent: The relationship between the flow coefficient (cv) and the closure member travel as it is moved from the closed position to rated travel with constant pressure drop across the valve.

Characteristic, linear: An inherent flow characteristic that can be represented by a straight line on a rectangular plot of flow coefficient (cv) versus rated travel. Therefore, equal increments of travel provide equal increments of flow coefficient (cv).

Characteristic, quick opening: An inherent flow characteristic in which a maximum flow coefficient is achieved with minimal closure member travel.

Characterized cam: A component in a valve positioner used to relate the closure member position to the control signal.

Characterized trim: Control valve trim that provides predefined flow characteristics.

Closure member: The movable part of the valve that is positioned in the flow path to modify the rate of flow through the valve.

Closure member configurations (plug):
  • Characterized: Closure member with contoured surface, such as the “vee plug,” to provide various flow characteristics.
  • Cylindrical: A cylindrical closure member with a flow passage through it (or a partial cylinder).
  • Eccentric: Closure member face is not concentric with the stem centerline and moves into seat when closing.
  • Eccentric spherical disk: Disk is spherical segment, not concentric with the disk stem.
  • Linear: A closure member that moves in a line perpendicular to the seating plane.
  • Rotary: A closure member which is rotated into or away from a seat to modulate flow.
Coefficient, flow: A constant (cv) related to the geometry of a valve, for a given valve travel, that can be used to predict flow rate.

Control valve: A valve which controls the flow rate or flow direction in a fluid system. The final control element, through which a fluid passes, that adjusts the flow passage as directed by a signal from a cont- roller to modify the flow rate.

Dual sealing valve: A valve that uses a resilient seating material for the primary seal and a metal-to-metal seat for a secondary seal.

End connection: The configuration provided to make a joint with the pipe.
  • End connections, flanged: Valve body with end connections incorporating flanges that mate with corresponding flanges on the piping.
  • End connections, split clamp: Valve end connections of various proprietary designs using split clamps to apply gasket or mating surface loading.
  • End connections, threaded: Valve end connections incorporating threads, either male or female.
  • End connections, welded: Valve end connections which have been prepared for welding to the line pipe or other fittings. May be butt weld (bw), or socket weld (sw).
Erosion resistant trim: Valve trim, that has been designed with special surface materials or geometry to resist the erosive effects of the controlled fluid flow.

Extension bonnet: A bonnet with a packing box that is extended above the bonnet joint of the valve body so as to maintain the temperature of the packing above or below the temperature of the process fluid. The length of the extension bonnet is dependent upon the difference between the fluid temperature and the packing design temperature limit as well as upon the valve body design.

Face to face dimension: The dimension from the face of the inlet opening to the face of the outlet opening of a valve or fitting.

Facing, flange: The finish on the end connection that mates with gasket surfaces.

Failure mode: The position to which the valve closure member moves when the actuating energy source fails.
  • Fail-closed: A condition wherein the valve closure member moves to a closed position when the actuating energy source fails.
  • Fail-in place: A condition wherein the valve closure member stays in its last position when the actuat- ing energy source fails.
  • Fail-open: A condition wherein the valve closure member moves to an open position when the actuat- ing energy source fails.
  • Fail-safe: A characteristic of a particular valve and its actuator, which upon loss of actuating energy supply, will cause a valve closure member to fully close, fully open or remain in fixed last position. Fail-safe action may involve the use of auxiliary controls connected to the actuator.
Flangeless control valve: A valve without integral line flanges, which is installed by bolting between companion flanges, with a set of bolts, or studs, generally extending through the companion flanges.

Guides, closure component: The means by which the closure is aligned with the seat and held stable throughout its travel. The guide is held rigidly in the body, bonnet, and/or bottom plate.

Hand jack: A manual override device, using a lever, to stroke a valve or to limit its travel.

Handwheel: A mechanical manual override device, using a rotary wheel, to stroke a valve or to limit its travel.

Hard facing: A material applied to valve internals to resist fluid erosion and/or to reduce the chance of galling between moving parts, particularly at high temperatures.

Hard plating: A thin metal deposit, sometimes electroplated, used to induce surface hardening. Hard plating is many orders of magnitude thinner than hard facing.

Hysteresis: The maximum difference in output value for any single input value during a calibration cycle, excluding errors due to dead band.

Integral seat: A flow control orifice and seat that is an integral part of the body or cage.

Jacketed valves: A valve body cast with a double wall or provided with a double wall by welding material around the body so as to form a passage for a heating or cooling medium. Also refers to valves which are enclosed in split metal jackets having internal heat passageways or electric heaters. Also referred to as “steam jacketed” or “vacuum jacketed.” in a vacuum jacketed valve, a vacuum is created in the space between the body and secondary outer wall to reduce the transfer of heat by convection from the atmosphere to the internal process fluid, usually cryogenic.

Lantern ring: A rigid spacer assembled in the packing box with packing normally above and below it and designed to allow lubrication of the packing or access for a leak-off connection.

Lapping-in: A process of mating contact surfaces by grinding and/or polishing.

Leakage, class: Classifications established by ansi b16.104 to categorize seat leakage tolerances for different sizes of control valve trim.

Leakage, seat: The quantity of fluid passing through a valve when the valve is in the fully closed position with pressure differential and temperature as specified.

Leak-off gland: A packing box with packing above and below the lantern ring so as to provide a collection point for fluid leaking past the primary seal (lower packing).

Lined valve body: A valve body in which a coating or liner has been applied to internal surfaces for cor- rosion/erosion protection or for flow shut off.

Liner, slip-in: An annular shaped liner which makes a slight interference fit with the body bore and which may be readily forced into position through the body end. May be plain or reinforced. Applies to butterfly valves.

Liquid pressure recovery factor: The ratio (fl) of the valve flow coefficient (cv) based on the pressure drop at the vena contracta, to the usual valve flow coefficient (cv) which is based on the overall pressure drop across the valve in non-vaporizing liquid service. These coefficients compare with the orifice metering coefficients of discharge for vena contracta taps and pipe taps, respectively. See ansi/isa-s75.01 “control valve sizing equations.”

Lubricator isolating valve: A manually operated valve used to isolate the packing lubricator assembly from the packing box.

Lubricator packing box: A packing arrangement consisting of a lantern ring with packing rings above and below with provision to lubricate the packing.

Mechanical limit stop: A mechanical device to limit the valve stem travel.

Mounting position: The location and orientation of an actuator or auxiliary component relative to the control valve. This can apply to the control valve itself relative to the piping.

Multiple orifice: A style of valve trim where the flow passes through a multiple of orifices in parallel or in series.

Nominal size: A numerical designation of size which is common to all components in a piping system other than components designated by outside diameters or by thread size. It is a convenient round number for reference purposes and is only loosely related to manufacturing dimensions. Iso uses initials dn as an abbreviation for the term with the letters dn followed by a numerical value designating size. All equipment of the same nominal size and nominal pressure rating shall have the same mating dimensions appropriate to the type of end connections.

Packing: A sealing system consisting of deformable material contained in a packing box which usually has an adjustable compression means to obtain or maintain an effective seal.

Packing box: The chamber, in the bonnet, surrounding the stem and containing packing and other stem sealing parts.

Packing flange: A device that transfers the deforming mechanical load to the packing follower.

Packing follower: A part which transfers the deforming mechanical load to the packing from the packing flange or nut.

Packing lubricator assembly: A device for injection of lubricant/sealer into a lubricator packing box.

Pinch or clamp valve: A valve consisting of a flexible elastomeric tubular member connected to two rigid flow path ends whereby modulation and/or shut off of flow is accomplished by squeezing the flexible member into eventual tight sealing contact.

Plug: A term frequently used to refer to the closure member.

Plug valve: A rotary motion valve with a closure member that may be cylindrical or conical. Port: The flow control orifice of a control valve.

Port guiding: A valve closure member with wings or a skirt fitting into the seat ring bore.

Positioner: A position controller, which is mechanically connected to a moving part of a final control element or its actuator, and automatically adjusts its output pressure to the actuator in order to maintain a desired position that bears a predetermined relationship to the input signal. The positioner can be used to modify the action of the valve (reversing positioner), extend the stroke/controller.

Positioner, double acting: A positioner with two outputs, suited to a double acting actuator.

Positioner, single acting: A positioner with one output, suited to a spring opposed actuator.

Position switch: A position switch is a pneumatic, hydraulic or electrical device which is linked to the valve stem to detect a single, preset valve stem position.

Position transmitter: The position transmitter is a device that is mechanically connected to the valve stem or shaft and generates and transmits a pneumatic or electrical signal representing the valve position.

Post guiding: A design using guide bushing or bushings fitted into the bonnet or body to guide the plug’s post.

Pressure energized seal: A seal energized by differential pressure.

Rangeability inherent: The ratio of the largest flow coefficient (cv) to the smallest flow coefficient (cv) within which the deviation from the specified inherent flow characteristic does not exceed the stated limits.

Rated travel: The amount of movement of the valve closure member from the closed position to the rated full open position.

Seat: The area of contact between the closure component and its mating surface which establishes valve shut-off.

Seat ring: A part of the valve body assembly that provides a seating surface for the closure member and may provide part of the flow control orifice.

Shaft: The mechanical member used to support a rotary closure member.

Spring rate: The force change per unit change in length of a spring.

Stem connector: The device which connects the actuator stem to the valve stem. Stem guide: A guide bushing closely fitted to the valve stem and aligned with the seat.

Three-way valve: A valve with three end connections, used for mixing or diverting flow.

Throttling: The action of a control valve to regulate fluid flow by varying the position of the closure member. This service generates a variable pressure drop.

Transducer: A device that is actuated by power from one system and supplies power in another form to a second system.

Travel: The movement of the closure member from the closed position to an intermediate or rated full open position.

Travel indicator: A pointer and scale used to externally show the position of the closure member; typically in terms of units of opening percent of travel or degrees of rotation.

Trim: The internal components of a valve which modulate the flow of the controlled fluid.
  • Trim, anti-cavitation: A combination of control valve trim that by its geometry reduces the tendency of the controlled liquid to cavitate.
  • Trim, anti-noise: A combination of control valve trim that by its geometry reduces the noise generated by fluid flowing through the valve.
  • Trim, balanced: Control valve trim designed to minimize the net static and dynamic fluid flow forces acting on the trim.
  • Trim, reduced: Control valve trim which has a flow area smaller than the full flow area for that valve. Trim, soft seated: Valve trim with an elastomeric, plastic or other readily deformable material used
  • either in the closure component or seat ring to provide tight shutoff with minimal actuator forces.
Unbalance, dynamic: The net force/torque produced on the valve stem/shaft by fluid pressure acting on the closure member and stem/shaft at stated travel and flowing conditions.

Unbalance, static: The net force produced on the valve stem by the fluid pressure acting on the closure member and stem with the fluid at rest and with stated pressure conditions.

Valve: A device used for the control of fluid flow, consisting of a fluid retaining assembly, one or more ports between end openings and a movable closure member which opens, restricts or closes the port(s).
  • Balve, ball: A valve with a rotary motion closure member consisting of a full ball or a segmented ball.
  • Valve, diaphragm type: A valve with a flexible linear motion closure member which is moved into the
  • fluid flow passageway of the body to modify the rate of flow through the valve by the actuator.
  • Valve, floating ball: A valve with a full ball positioned within the valve that contacts either of two seat rings and is free to move toward the seat ring opposite the pressure source when in the closed position to effect tight shutoff.
  • Valve, globe: A valve with a linear motion closure member, one or more ports and a body distinguished by a globular shaped cavity around the port region.
Vena contracta: The location in a flow stream where fluid velocity is at its maximum and fluid static pressure and the cross-sectional area are at their minimum. In a control valve, the vena contracta normally occurs just downstream of the actual physical restriction.

Yoke: The structure which rigidly connects the actuator power unit to the valve.

Glossary courtesy of Cashco, Inc. For more information about Cashco products, contact Miller Energy, Inc. Call them at 800-631-5454 or visit their web site at https://millerenergy.com.

How Do Magnetic Level Indicators Work?

Magnetic Level IndicatorMagnetic Level Indicators also known as MLIs, have revolutionized the global visual indication market by offering a safer, reliable, and high-visibility alternative to common gauge glass assemblies.  They provide high-visibility representation of the liquid level in a vessel. MLIs can be mounted to tanks in a number of different ways. The most popular configuration, however, is called a side-mount.

The Magnetic Level Indicator (MLI) working principle is widely used in many industrial level applications. The operating principle behind a magnetic level indicator is that the MLI shares the same process fluid as the vessel, and therefore shares the same level.

The three primary components to a Magnetic Level Indicator are:
  • The float
  • The chamber
  • The visual indicator

Magnetic Level IndicatorThe float (contained within the chamber) interacts with the externally mounted visual indicator. As liquid rises and falls in the vessel and MLI chamber, the float follows. The magnets in the float interact with magnets inside each indicator flag. As the float rises and falls in the chamber, the magnets slowly turn each flag 180 degrees. This allows the visible flag color to change to a high-contrasting, highly-visible representation of liquid level.



Magnetic Level Indicator



Utilizing a combination of proven buoyancy principles along with the benefits magnetism, MLIs can be customized to fit virtually any process connection arrangement on the vessel.

The chamber and magnetic float is available in a variety of materials and pressure ratings to accommodate the wide variety of complex process applications present in the world’s major industrial facilities.

Areas Where Magnetic Level Indicator Are Applied:

  • Feed water heaters and boilers
  • Refinery and chemical industries
  • Energy and power plant technology
  • Pulp and paper applications
  • Oil and gas industries
  • Gas plants
  • Pipeline compressor applications
  • Pharmaceutical applications
  • Food and beverage applications

For more information about Magnetic Level Indicators (MLI's), contact Miller Energy by calling 800-631-5454 or visit their web site at https://millerenergy.com.

Process Instrumentation and Valves for the Chemical and Petrochemical Industries


Miller Energy provides process control instruments and valves designed to assist in higher quality yields, more efficient processes, and greater plant safety for chemical processing and petrochemical refining manufacturing facilities. 


The Chemical Industry


The chemical industry is key to industrial production. It transforms the raw materials of animals, vegetables and minerals into a host of products used by both the industrial and domestic customers. Lightweight and durable plastic products contribute to fuel effectiveness in transportation, energy-saving insulation material in buildings, paints and protective coatings that extend metal and wood life, soap, shampoo and detergents maintain us clean, pharmaceuticals and disinfectants protect our health. Without vital chemicals, computers and telecommunications systems could not work.

The industry has matured using local resources such as salt, coal, lime, vegetable products and animal fats. It is now a worldwide sector that mainly uses natural gas and oil fractions such as naphtha as the main raw materials. There is a strong awareness of the need to substitute fossil resources both as raw materials and for process energy with sustainable options.

The Petrochemical Manufacturing Industry


The sector produces petrochemicals which are petroleum and natural gas chemicals (organic compounds not burned as fuel). Ethylene, propylene, butylene, benzene, toluene, styrene, xylene, ethyl benzene and cumene are key products. These products are fundamental construction blocks in the manufacturing of consumer products, automotive parts and numerous sustainable and unsustainable goods. These products are fundamental construction blocks in the manufacturing of consumer products, automotive parts and numerous durable goods. This sector does not include organic compounds such as ethyl alcohol and inorganic chemicals such as carbon black.

Olefins and aromatics constitute the building blocks of a large variety of products, including solvents, detergents and adhesives. Polymers and oligomers used in plastics, resins, fibers, elastomers, lubricants and gels are built upon olefins.

Miller Energy: Chemical and Petrochemical Instrumentation and Valve Experts


Miller Energy offers a broad range of instrumentation and valves for these diverse markets. Since 1958, Miller Energy, Inc. has exceeded customers expectations in the Chemical and Petrochemical Industries by specifying and providing the highest quality instrumentation and valves. Known for unparalleled customer service and local technical support, Miller's comprehensive line of pressure, temperature, level, flow and analytical products are available now and ready to solve your most challenging chemical and petrochemical applications.

Contact the Miller Energy office in your area by visiting this web page, or call 800-631-5454 for further assistance.

Installing the ASCO 212 Series Composite Valve Using the FasN Connection System


The ASCO series 212 composite valve is intended for use in applications for water purification and water treatment, especially in the implementation of the membrane-based filtration. The composite valve series 212 is perfect for use in mid-size Reverse Osmosis Systems apps requiring lead-free and NSF-approved construction. The series 212 composite valves are available in 3/8", 1/2", 3/4", and 1" pipe sizes rated for pressures up to 150 PSIG and 180 degrees F.

The video above demonstrates how to install the series 212 using the patented ASCO FasN system for NPT threaded connections, turn and lock connections, and solvent bond connections.

For more information, contact Miller Energy Inc. by calling 800-631-5454 or visit their web site at https://millerenergy.com.

How to Change Loss of Signal Failure Mode on the Cashco Ranger Control Valve


This video provides step-by-step instructions on how to change the Cashco Ranger (control valve) loss of signal failure mode from air to open / fail closed to air to close/ fail open, as well as remounting and recalibrating the valve positioner.

The Cashco Ranger is one of the most popular control valves on the market. It is the most versatile, adaptable, and easily maintainable valve ever produced.

The Ranger offers over 6 different trim combinations. Trim can easily be changed in less than 5 minutes without disturbing the packing, actuator, or positioner calibration. The service area is a thread-less design, which resists corrosion or collection of chemical deposits.

A selection of 3 body materials with a broad temperature range from -325°F to +750°F makes the Ranger adaptable for use in steam, heat transfer fluids, slurries, gases, liquids, and cryogenic applications. The Ranger’s unique dual seating design provides both Class VI and backup Class IV seat leakage. And the standard patented live-loaded packing system lets you check and adjust packing without the need for specialized tools or complicated procedures.

For more information about Cashco in Metro New York, New Jersey, and Eastern Pennsylvania contact:

Miller Energy, Inc.
New York Metro and Northern NJ: 800-631-5454
Eastern PA, Southern NJ, Delaware: 888-631-5454
https://www.millerenergy.com