Showing posts with label Cashco. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Cashco. Show all posts

How to Change Loss of Signal Failure Mode on the Cashco Ranger Control Valve


This video provides step-by-step instructions on how to change the Cashco Ranger (control valve) loss of signal failure mode from air to open / fail closed to air to close/ fail open, as well as remounting and recalibrating the valve positioner.

The Cashco Ranger is one of the most popular control valves on the market. It is the most versatile, adaptable, and easily maintainable valve ever produced.

The Ranger offers over 6 different trim combinations. Trim can easily be changed in less than 5 minutes without disturbing the packing, actuator, or positioner calibration. The service area is a thread-less design, which resists corrosion or collection of chemical deposits.

A selection of 3 body materials with a broad temperature range from -325°F to +750°F makes the Ranger adaptable for use in steam, heat transfer fluids, slurries, gases, liquids, and cryogenic applications. The Ranger’s unique dual seating design provides both Class VI and backup Class IV seat leakage. And the standard patented live-loaded packing system lets you check and adjust packing without the need for specialized tools or complicated procedures.

For more information about Cashco in Metro New York, New Jersey, and Eastern Pennsylvania contact:

Miller Energy, Inc.
New York Metro and Northern NJ: 800-631-5454
Eastern PA, Southern NJ, Delaware: 888-631-5454
https://www.millerenergy.com

Understanding How Flame Arresters Work


Flame Arrester
A Flame Arrester (or arrestor) is a passive devices with no moving parts, that allows hot gas to pass through, but stops a flame in order to prevent a larger fire or explosion.  Flame Arresters uses a wound metal ribbon type element that prevents the spread of flame from the exposed side of the arrester to the protected side of the arrester. The metal element's construction provides a matrix of engineered openings that are carefully calculated and sized to quench the flame by absorbing the flame's heat. As an explosion flame travels through a narrow metal space, heat is transmitted to the walls, energy is lost and only vapor gasses are able to pass through. Flame Arresters are used in many industries chemical, petrochemical, pulp and paper, refining, pharmaceutical, mining, power generation, and wastewater treatment.

Cashco Flame Arresters are specifically engineered to match the explosive mixtures Maximum Experimental Safe Gap, in order to ensure complete extinction of the flame. At the heart of each Cashco flame arrestor lies filter discs that consists of wound, smooth and channeled strips of stainless steel set at specific maximum experimental stage gaps the smaller the gaps are which the flame travels the more heat and energy is lost therefore the filters gap width and gap length are specifically engineered to match the explosive mixture in order to ensure complete extinction of the flame. 

To learn more about Cashco flame arrestors, contact Miller Energy, Inc. by calling 908-755-6700 or by visiting https://millerenergy.com.


How Do Pilot Operated Tank Relief Valves Work?

Storage tanks become pressurized when liquid is pumped in and compresses the existing tank vapor. Tanks also become pressurized due to increasing ambient temperatures, which cause the tank vapor to expand. To mitigate damage from these expanding tank vapors, pressure relief valves are installed on tanks to prevent structural damage resulting from over-pressure.

Here is an excellent animation, courtesy of Cashco, that shows how a pilot operated relief vent protects a storage tank from over pressurizing during a pump-in situation or during thermal heating conditions.


For more information on tank relief valves, contact Miller Energy at www.millerenergy.com or by calling 908-755-6700.

Cashco / Valve Concepts Model 3100 Packing Material Removal and Weight Installation Instructions

Valve Concepts Model 3100
Valve Concepts Model 3100
The Model 3100 end-of-line conservation breather vent is part of the Valve Concepts, Inc. modular vent product line. The Model 3100 can easily be field converted to a vacuum only vent, a pressure/vacuum vent with pipe away and can either be direct acting or pilot operated.

The Model 3100 end-of-line conservation breather vent is designed for use on atmospheric and low-pressure storage tanks where pressure and vacuum relief is required.

How it Works

Weight loaded pallets in the vent housing allow the intake of air and the escape of vapors as the tank breathes due to thermal changes and product movement in and out of the tank. The pallets open and close to permit in breathing and out breathing necessary to maintain the tank pressure within permissible limits to avoid damage to the tank.

Industrial Control Valves

cutaway view of industrial control valve plug valve
Cutaway view of industrial control valve
Courtesy Cashco
Control valves are at the heart of almost every fluid based industrial control process. Understanding their basic operation and function is essential for the process engineer, operator, or other stakeholder. A previous blog provided a good information source for those wishing to learn about control valves or review and hone their technical knowledge. The applications for which control valves are used seem uncountable in their variety, but common operating traits of control valves enable their use in every one.

Cashco, globally recognized manufacturer of industrial control products including control valves, regulators, controllers, pressure/vacuum relief vents, and flame and detonation arrestors, will be exhibiting at Interphex in Booth 3464 on March 21 through March 23 at the Jacob Javits Center in New York City. Knowledgeable personnel will be on hand to discuss your industrial control applications and challenges. If your plans include attendance at Interphex this year, take advantage of the opportunity to speak face to face with representatives of an industry leader.



Tank Blanketing Valve Function and Useful Features

tank blanketing valve
Tank Blanketing Valve
Caschco - Valve Concepts
The filling of vapor space in a liquid containing tank with a gas is referred to as "tank blanketing", and sometimes "padding". Specialized valves are available, designed to simplify the incorporation of a tank blanketing function in an operation.

Often, the gas employed to fill the vapor space in a tank is nitrogen. The purpose of blanketing can vary, but generally involves preservation of the stored product or safety. In both cases, one goal is to keep oxygen levels in the vapor space sufficiently low to inhibit ignition of flammable products, or minimize oxidation and its impact on stored product quality. The inflow of blanketing gas can also be used to keep the tank under positive pressure relative to the surrounding space, considered to harbor contaminants which could otherwise leak into the tank.


What are some functions of a tank blanketing valve?



  • Maintain positive pressure in the tank at a selected setpoint.
  • Provide gas control at very low flow rates, or close bubble tight, when tank liquid level is static.
  • Adjust gas flow to compensate for the maximum liquid draw down rate.
  • Provide sufficient closure to prevent supply gas from excessively pressurizing tank.
Blanketing valves are used in conjunction with vents to provide a full range of control over the pressure and content of the vapor space within a tank. A single valve solution eases the design and component selection burden of amassing individual components and combining them into a working assembly. Some useful features of a blanketing valve include:
  • Bubble tight shutoff to prevent wasting of purge gas.
  • Self cleaning flow path design.
  • Pressure balanced pilot, so supply pressure fluctuations do not impact the setpoint.
  • Setpoint not appreciably affected by changes in temperature.
  • Low maintenance requirements, including complete access to valve internals without removing the valve from the tank.
More detail, including a description of the elements required for proper valve sizing, is found in the document below. Share your fluid process measurement and control challenges with application specialists, combining your process experience and knowledge with their product application expertise to develop effective solutions.

Know Your Control Valve Basics?

Industrial Control Valve Cutaway View
Courtesy Cashco
Understanding basic operation and function of control valves, an integral part of many industrial process control loops, is essential for the process engineer, operator, or other stakeholder. This presentation outlines control valve operation, major components, and terminology used to describe valve parts, functions, and principles of operation. A useful reference for stakeholders in need of a refresher course in order to understand what the engineers are saying, it also provides detailed illustrations, charts, and description that will prove valuable to the more technical minded.


What you will find:


  • Terminology: A glossary of terms commonly used in the control valve world.
  • Control Valve Basic Designs: Control valve classifications, cutaway illustrations showing the operating structure of different valve types, comparisons of varying valve designs.
  • Characterization and Trim Design: Flow characteristic curves and comparisons for different valve types, showing how flow responds to valve position change.
  • Control Valve Technical Considerations: FTC vs FTO, illustrations showing valve operation.
  • Force-Balance Principle: Illustration and formula explanations of this basic operating principle.
  • Actuator Basic Designs: Illustrations showing the differing arrangements for actuator operation.
  • Control Valve Unit Action: Illustrations, diagrams, and explanations of a range of valve operating conditions, including loss of electrical power and loss of instrument air supply.
  • Actuator Benchset Range: Shows practical relationship between instrument air pressure and valve ability to properly operate at various pressure conditions.
  • Valve Positioner Basics: Definition of valve positioning, reasons to use a positioner, schematic illustrations of control loops.
  • Control Loop Action: Charts and provides examples of 16 combinations of Process, Controller, Positioner, and Control Valve combinations.
  • Control Valve Packing Designs: Describes and defines packing, common problems, current state of the art. Cutaway illustrations of various packing arrangements.
  • Seat Leakage: Classifications, comparisons of different materials.


There is something of value in the document for everyone, and you will undoubtedly pick up something useful. Thanks go out to the engineers at Cashco for putting this together. You can discuss any aspect of your control valve applications with a product specialist. Your contact is always welcome.