Showing posts with label West Virginia. Show all posts
Showing posts with label West Virginia. Show all posts

Process Instrumentation and Valves for the Chemical and Petrochemical Industries


Miller Energy provides process control instruments and valves designed to assist in higher quality yields, more efficient processes, and greater plant safety for chemical processing and petrochemical refining manufacturing facilities. 


The Chemical Industry


The chemical industry is key to industrial production. It transforms the raw materials of animals, vegetables and minerals into a host of products used by both the industrial and domestic customers. Lightweight and durable plastic products contribute to fuel effectiveness in transportation, energy-saving insulation material in buildings, paints and protective coatings that extend metal and wood life, soap, shampoo and detergents maintain us clean, pharmaceuticals and disinfectants protect our health. Without vital chemicals, computers and telecommunications systems could not work.

The industry has matured using local resources such as salt, coal, lime, vegetable products and animal fats. It is now a worldwide sector that mainly uses natural gas and oil fractions such as naphtha as the main raw materials. There is a strong awareness of the need to substitute fossil resources both as raw materials and for process energy with sustainable options.

The Petrochemical Manufacturing Industry


The sector produces petrochemicals which are petroleum and natural gas chemicals (organic compounds not burned as fuel). Ethylene, propylene, butylene, benzene, toluene, styrene, xylene, ethyl benzene and cumene are key products. These products are fundamental construction blocks in the manufacturing of consumer products, automotive parts and numerous sustainable and unsustainable goods. These products are fundamental construction blocks in the manufacturing of consumer products, automotive parts and numerous durable goods. This sector does not include organic compounds such as ethyl alcohol and inorganic chemicals such as carbon black.

Olefins and aromatics constitute the building blocks of a large variety of products, including solvents, detergents and adhesives. Polymers and oligomers used in plastics, resins, fibers, elastomers, lubricants and gels are built upon olefins.

Miler Energy: Chemical and Petrochemical Instrumentation and Valve Experts


Miller Energy offers a broad range of instrumentation and valves for these diverse markets. Since 1958, Miller Energy, Inc. has exceeded customers expectations in the Chemical and Petrochemical Industries by specifying and providing the highest quality instrumentation and valves. Known for unparalleled customer service and local technical support, Miller's comprehensive line of pressure, temperature, level, flow and analytical products are available now and ready to solve your most challenging chemical and petrochemical applications.

Contact the Miller Energy office in your area by visiting this web page, or call 800-631-5454 for further assistance.

Hazardous Areas: Division and Zone Classification System

Hazardous area
Hazards areas are associated with flammable
vapors or gases, ignitable fibers, and combustible dusts.
Hazardous areas refer to locations with a possible risk of explosion or fire due to dangerous atmosphere. The hazards can be associated with flammable vapors or gases, ignitable fibers, and combustible dusts.

Different hazardous area classifications exist in the North America and Europe. Generally, the National Electric Code (NEC) classifications govern hazardous areas in the US. While in Europe, hazardous area classification has been specified by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC).

Below is a description of the Division and Zone classification system.



CLASS
NATURE OF HAZARDOUS MATERIAL
CLASS I
Hazardous area due the presence of flammable vapors or gases in sufficient quantities to produce ignitable mixtures and cause an explosion.
Examples include natural gas and liquified petroleum.
CLASS II
Hazardous area due the presence of conductive or combustible dusts in sufficient quantities to produce ignitable mixtures and cause an explosion.
Examples include aluminum and magnesium powders.
CLASS III
Hazardous area due the presence of flammable fibers or other flying debris that collect around lighting fixtures, machinery, and other areas in sufficient quantities to produce ignitable mixtures and cause an explosion.
Examples include sawdust and flyings



Division groups hazardous areas based on the chances of an explosion due to the presence of flammable materials in the area.

DIVISION
LIKELIHOOD OF HAZARDOUS MATERIAL
DIVISION 1
Areas where there is a high chance of an explosion due to hazardous material that is present periodically, intermittently, or continuously under normal operation.
DIVISION 2
Areas where there is a low chance of an explosion under normal operation.


Group categorizes areas based on the type of flammable or ignitable materials in the environment. As per NEC guidelines, Groups A to D classify gasses while Groups E to G classify dust and flying debris.
GROUP
TYPE OF HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN THE AREA
GROUP A
Acetylene.
GROUP B
Area contains flammable gas, liquid, or liquid produced vapor with any of the following characteristics:
  • Minimum Ignition Current (MIC) value equal to or less than 0.40
  • Maximum Experimental Safe Gap (MESG) value equal to or less than 0.45 mm
  • Combustible gas with more than 30 percent volume
Examples include hydrogen, ethylene oxide, acrolein, propylene oxide.

GROUP C
Area contains flammable gas, liquid, or liquid produced vapor with any of the following characteristics:
  • Minimum Ignition Current (MIC) value between 0.40 and 0.80
  • Maximum Experimental Safe Gap (MESG) value greater than 0.75 mm
Examples include carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulphide, ether, cyclopropane, morphline, acetaldehyde, isoprene, and ethylene.

GROUP D
Area contains flammable gas, liquid, or liquid produced vapor with any of the following characteristics:
  • Minimum Ignition Current (MIC) value greater than 0.80
  • Maximum Experimental Safe Gap (MESG) value greater than 0.75 mm
Examples include ammonia, gasoline, butane, benzene, hexane, ethanol, methane, methanol, natural gas, propane, naphtha, and vinyl chloride.

GROUP E
Area contains metal dusts such as magnesium, aluminum, chromium, bronze, titanium, zinc, and other combustible dusts whose abrasiveness, size, and conductivity present a hazard.

GROUP F
Area contains carbonaceous dusts such as charcoal, coal black, carbon black, coke dusts and others that present an explosion hazard.
GROUP G
Area contains combustible dusts not classified in Groups E and F.
Examples include starch, grain, flour, wood, plastic, sugar, and chemicals.


NOTE: This post serves only as a guide to acquaint the reader with hazardous area classifications in the USA. It is imperative to discuss your instrumentation, valve, or process equipment requirement with a qualified applications expert prior to installing any electrical device inside of any hazardous area.


6 Benefits of Using Wireless Networking Systems in Industrial Applications

Wireless Networking Systems in Industrial ApplicationsWireless technologies offer great value over wired solutions. A reduction in cost is just one of the many benefits of switching to the wireless networking system. There are many benefits, including enhanced management of legacy systems that were previously not possible with a wired networking connection.

Here is an overview of some of the value-added benefits of adopting wireless networking in industrial plants.
  1. Reduced Installation Costs - Savings in installation costs is the key benefit of a wireless networking system. The cost of installing a wireless solution is significantly lower as compared to its wired counterpart. Installing a wireless network requires less planning. Extensive surveys are not required to route the wires to control rooms. This reduced installation cost is the main reason industrial setups should consider going wireless instead of having a wired networking system. 
  2. Improved Information Accuracy - Adopting wireless networking also results in improved accuracy of information. The wireless system is not prone to interferences. As a result, the system ensures consistent and timely transfer of information from one node to another. 
  3. Enhanced Flexibility - Enhanced flexibility is another reason for deploying wireless networking solutions in an industrial setting. Additional points can be awarded easily in an incremental manner. The wireless system can also integrate with legacy systems without any issues. 
  4. Operational Efficiencies - Migrating to wireless networking can help in improving operational efficiencies as well. Plant managers can troubleshoot and diagnose issues more easily. The system facilitates predictive maintenance by allowing the monitoring of remote assets. 
  5. Human Safety - Another critical factor that should influence the decision to migrate to wireless networking is the human safety factor. Wireless technologies allow safer operations, reducing exposure to harmful environments. For instance, a wireless system can be used in taking a reading and adjusting valves without having to go to the problematic area to take measurements. With wireless networking systems, readings can be taken more frequently that can help in early detection and reduction of possible incidents. 
  6. Efficient Information Transfer - Another advantage is that the time required to reach a device is reduced. This results in a more efficient transfer of information between network segments that are geographically separated. The industry wireless networking standards use IP addresses to allow remote access to data from field devices. 

For more information on wireless technologies in industrial settings, contact Miller Energy by visiting https://millerenergy.com or by calling 800-631-5454.

Interface in the Field: Achieving Reliable Interface Measurement to Optimize Process and Increase Uptime

Interface or multiphase level measurements exist throughout the Oil & Gas streams as well as Petrochemical. While level measurement technologies have come a long way in effectively measuring liquids and solids, multiphase level measurement continues to be the biggest challenge and opportunity that exists today to which there is no perfect technology.

However, experience has shown that process optimization and increased uptime can still be achieved in many separator applications through reliable, best-in-class, level technology.

The objective of this paper is to review interface challenges, the current technologies being utilized for interface, field experience in various applications to achieve process optimization and increased uptime, and the future of reliable interface measurement.

DOWNLOAD THE TECHNICAL PAPER HERE

Courtesy of Magnetrol and Miller Energy, Inc.
https://millerenergy.com
800-631-5454

Miller Energy Acquires V-F Controls of Ohio

Miller Energy, Inc. is pleased to announce the acquisition of V-F Controls
as of January 1, 2019.


V-F Controls is a leading distributor of process Instrumentation, controls and metering equipment serving Western Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Ohio. With over 150 years of combined experience, the merger of Miller Energy and V-F Controls will offer our customers the most technical customer support and application expertise in the industry, an unparalleled product portfolio, and a continued commitment to outstanding customer service.

For all inquiries and communications:

Miller Energy, Inc. (Ohio)
555 Golden Oak Parkway
Cleveland, OH 44146
Ph: (440)735-0100
Fax: (440)735-0123

ASCO Express Product Catalog

The ASCO Express program features a range of flow control products and accessories available for shipment the same day you order them. The products listed in this catalog provide the performance required for a variety of system and process applications including boiler, air handling, process control, and water and steam control. The control voltages available for each product are the primary voltages used in industrial and commercial applications today.

908-755-6700

Miller Energy Inc. Announces Acquisition of Fox & Dole Technical Sales


Miller Energy is pleased to announce the acquisition of Fox & Dole Technical Sales as of November 1, 2018.

Founded in 1974, Fox & Dole is a leading distributor of process instrumentation and controls serving Western Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Ohio. With over 100 years of combined experience, the merger of our two companies will offer our customers the most technical customer support and application expertise in the industry, an unparalleled product portfolio, and a continued commitment to outstanding customer service.