Showing posts with label flow. Show all posts
Showing posts with label flow. Show all posts

Register Early for the Yokogawa Users Conference 2018

Yokogawa Users Conference North America
The Yokogawa Users Conference for North America will be held
on September 10 - 13 in Orlando, FL
Yokogawa is hosting its Users Conference in Orlando FL for 2018. This excellent event enables attendees to:

  • Learn how to maximize the value of their measurement and control investment.
  • View and learn about the latest products and solutions for process measurement and control.
  • Interact with subject experts and Yokogawa partners.
  • Network with industry peers.
  • Build knowledge of best practices for particular industries and measurement and control in general.
There will be panel discussions, technical sessions, exhibits and more. The event is scheduled for September 10th through 13th, and early registration has started. Make plans to attend and build your knowledge base. You can find the registration information at the conference website, or reach out to a Yokogawa representative to find out more.

Magnetic Flow Meters

magnetic flowmeter flow meter on large flanged lined pipe section
Magnetic flow meters can be easily applied in lined
pipe sections and those of substantial diameter.
Image courtesy Yokogawa
The measurement of fluid flow is a common process control function. Flow measurement can have a range of differing output requirements, depending upon the needs of the process operators. With many technologies and instruments from which to choose, knowledge of the principals behind each measurement technology and basic operation requirements can help in the selection of the best instrument for each application. 

Anywhere there are pipes, somebody wants to know how much fluid is passing through them. Industrial flow meters rely on their ability to measure the change in some physical characteristic of fluid moving within a pipe that can be related to fluid velocity or mass flow. Depending upon the nature of the raw measurement, additional information and processing may be necessary to convert the base measurement into a useful measurement of flow rate.

In the processing industries, differing technologies are used to measure fluid motion. Some common technologies include magnetic, ultrasonic, vortex shedding, Coriolis and differential pressure. This list is not exhaustive, and several other technologies will certainly be found in use. Each methodology survives within a competitive marketplace due to its unique combination of performance and value attributes. Let's look at magnetic flow meters, also referred to as magmeters.

The operational principle of a magnetic flow meter is based upon Faraday’s Law. This fundamental scientific principle states that a voltage will be induced across a conductor moving at a right angle through a magnetic field, with the voltage being proportional to the velocity of the conductor. The principle allows for an inherently hard-to-measure aspect of a conductive fluid to be expressed via the magmeter. In a magmeter application, the instrument produces the magnetic field referred to in Faraday’s Law. The conductor, moving at a right angle to the magnetic field, is the fluid. The actual measurement of a magnetic flow meter is the induced voltage corresponding to fluid velocity. This can be used to determine volumetric flow and mass flow when combined with values of other fluid properties and the pipe cross sectional area. Magnetic flow meters enjoy some positive application attributes.
  • Magnetic flow meters have no moving parts.
  • The instrument, which often resembles a pipe section, can be lined with corrosion resistant material for use with aggressive media.
  • With no sensor insertions or obstructions in the fluid path, the impact of the instrument on the flow is minimal.
  • Accuracy, when compared to other technologies, is high.
  • Application to laminar, turbulent, and transitional flow profiles is permissible.
  • Generally, measurement is not adversely impacted by fluid viscosity, specific gravity, temperature and pressure.
  • Magnetic flow meter technology can be applied to a very wide range of pipe sizes.
  • Device responds rapidly to changes in fluid flow.
  • Can be successfully applied to liquids containing heavy particulates.
  • Generally long service life with little maintenance.
Though the roster of positive attributes is strong, magmeters are not universally applied. Consider some of these points with respect to your potential application.
  • The fluid acts as the "conductor", as stated in Faraday's Law. Magnetic flow meters only work on liquids with conductivity above a certain threshold. They may be unsuitable for use with hydrocarbons and high purity water for this reason.
  • Cannot be used to measure gas flow because gases are not sufficiently conductive.
  • Piping must be grounded.
  • Generally, rated accuracy requires the pipe cross section to be filled by the liquid being measured.
This listing of attributes is very general in nature. Some magnetic flow meter variants have adaptations that minimize or accommodate the impact of special process conditions. Share your flow measurement requirements and challenges with a process measurement specialist. Your own knowledge and experience will be leveraged into an effective solution by their product application expertise.

Miller Energy Exhibiting at ISPE Delaware Chapter Symposium and Exhibition

Miller Energy, Inc. is exhibiting at the ISPE Delaware Valley Chapter
28th Annual Symposium & Exhibition, Booth #2034
For the 28th year, the ISPE Delaware Valley Chapter is hosting a symposium and exhibition supporting pharmaceutical industry research, production and operations. The event is held at Lincoln Financial Field, in Philadelphia, and draws broad participation from industry participants of all types. Miller Energy, a process measurement and control solutions provider, is exhibiting at booth #2034 in the exhibition area. The company is located in the Philadelphia area and has been serving the industry for many years, meeting application challenges for fluid measurement and control, as well as other related operations. 

Learn more about Miller Energy with a visit to their website, but more importantly, stop by their booth and introduce yourself when you go to the exhibition. Share your process measurement and control challenges with the seasoned professionals at Miller Energy. Leverage your own knowledge and experience with their product application expertise.

Focus Your Product Selection Quickly With This Useful Tool

Yokogawa Process Instrumentation Selection Tool
The Process Instrumentation Selection Tool from Yokogawa
enables the user to make detailed product selections
with a few clicks.
Image courtesy Yokogawa
In the process measurement sphere, manufacturers respond to market demand and their own growth goals by offering integrated product solutions. This can result in a product offering that is extensive, with many different products that can be applied to the same task. There are often several, or many, choices to winnow down to a final selection. Product research and evaluation for application suitability takes time. In today's business environment, time is what we never seem to have in sufficient quantity. Finding ways to streamline any process can be beneficial.

Yokogawa is one of those companies that manufactures a broad range of products for process measurement. Whatever your process measurement needs, it is likely the Yokogawa has an effective solution that delivers solid quality and performance.

In a past blog posting, we introduced readers to Process Instrument Selection Tool. With some basic information about your application, a few clicks can quickly deliver access to the best product selection for an application. It is simple, rapid and accurate. The product selector covers 24 basic measurement and instrumentation classifications. We are posting about it again because it has been so successful in helping customers zoom in on the right product solutions for their process measurement applications.

The Product Finder is accessible through a number of links throughout Yokogawa's network of representatives. Clicking the link lands you on the start page of the Product Finder. Try it out, and share your process measurement and control challenges with application specialists for even more leveraging of your own process knowledge and experience toward an effective solution.

Level and Flow Instruments for Hygienic Applications

Magnetrol is a globally recognized leader in the manufacture of flow and level instrumentation for industrial scale applications. The products employ a range of differing technologies to provide measurement precision across an array of challenging applications. The informational piece included below highlights Magnetrol's products intended for use in industries, such as pharma or food processing, where special materials and product design are employed to meet the special requirements of hygienic processing.

Share your flow and level measurement challenges with process instrumentation experts, combining your own knowledge and experience with their expertise to develop effective solutions.


Wireless Transmitters In Process Measurement and Control

industrial wireless temperature transmitter
Wireless industrial temperature transmitter
Courtesy Yokogawa
In process control, various devices produce signals which represent flow, temperature, pressure, and other measurable elements of the process. In delivering the process value from the measurement point to the point of decision, also known as the controller, systems have traditionally relied on wires. More recently, industrial wireless networks have evolved, though point-to-point wireless systems are still available and in use. A common operating protocol today is known as WirelessHARTTM, which features the same hallmarks of control and diagnostics featured in wired systems without any accompanying cables. Other wireless standards are employed in industrial settings, as well.

Wireless devices and wired devices can cohabitate the same network. The installation costs of wireless networks are decidedly lower than wired networks due to the reduction in labor and materials for the wireless arrangement. Wireless networks are also more efficient than their wired peers in regards to auxiliary measurements, involving measurement of substances at several points. Adding robustness to wireless, self-organizing networks is easy, because when new wireless components are introduced to a network, they can link to the existing network without needing to be reconfigured manually. Gateways can accommodate a large number of devices, allowing a very elastic range for expansion.

In a coal fired plant, plant operators walk a tightrope in monitoring multiple elements of the process. They calibrate limestone feed rates in conjunction with desulfurization systems, using target values determined experientially. A difficult process environment results from elevated slurry temperature, and the associated pH sensors can only last for a limited time under such conditions. Thanks to the expandability of wireless transmitters, the incremental cost is reduced thanks to the flexibility of installing new measurement loops. In regards to maintenance, the status of wireless devices is consistently transmitted alongside the process variable. Fewer manual checks are needed, and preventative measures may be reduced compared to wired networks.

Time Synchronized Mesh Protocol (TSMP) ensures correct timing for individual transmissions, which lets every transmitter’s radio and processor ‘rest’ between either sending or receiving a transmission. To compensate for the lack of a physical wire, in terms of security, wireless networks are equipped with a combination of authentication, encryption, verification, and key management. The amalgamation of these security practices delivers wireless network security equal to that of a wired system. The multilayered approach, anchored by gateway key-management, presents a defense sequence. Thanks to the advancements in modern field networking technology, interference due to noise from other networks has been minimized to the point of being a rare concern. Even with the rarity, fail-safes are included in WirelessHARTTM.

All security functions are handled by the network autonomously, meaning manual configuration is unnecessary. In addition to process control environments, power plants will typically use two simultaneous wireless networks. Transmitters allow both safety showers and eyewash stations to trigger an alarm at the point of control when activated. Thanks to reduced cost, and their ease of applicability in environments challenging to wired systems, along with their developed performance and security, wireless industrial connectivity will continue to expand.

Share your process measurement and control challenges with knowledgeable professionals, combining your own process knowledge and experience with their product application expertise to develop effective solutions.

Applying Coriolis Flowmeters

coriolis flowmeter for industrial process measurement
Coriolis Flowmeter
Courtesy Yokogawa
Coriolis mass flow meters are widely used throughout the process measurement and control field. Their basic operating principle, combined with modern sensor and signal processing technology, provide a list of potential application advantages.
  • Directly measure mass flow based on the principle of measurement.
  • No "moving" parts (except the slightly vibrating sensor tubes).
  • Coriolis sensors have the ability to measure flow of non-conductive fluids.
  • Measure the mass flow rate with high accuracy.
  • Instruments can be applied across a wide usable measurement range.
  • Deliver density measurement based on oscillating frequency.
  • Not materially impacted by fluid viscosity or density.
  • Coriolis flow meters also do not need lengthy straight pipe sections upstream or downstream of the sensing unit.

SELECTION AND INSTALLATION RECOMMENDATIONS


Some considerations for product selection and installation of Coriolis mass flow meters:

  • Rapid temperature changes within the measured medium can impact measurement accuracy.
  • Wide ranges of connection types are available, specify the best match for your system.
  • Select sensor tube construction material to accommodate media characteristics.
  • For liquid measurement, the sensor tube will extend downward from a horizontal pipe run. 
  • As with most industrial products, there may be restrictions on where the device may be used. For example, not for use in aircraft. Assure that your application conforms with the intended usage of the instrument.
  • Install at least one tight shutoff valve adjacent to the instrument for purposes of zeroing. Isolation valves for inlet and outlet are preferred.
  • Follow manufacturer recommendations for pipe supports, if required, at inlet and outlet sides of the unit
  • Avoid installation at locations with high levels of vibration or strong electrical fields.
  • Locate the sensor unit at the lowest practical level in the piping system. This helps avoid collection of gas bubbles in the sensor tubes.
  • Sensor tubes need to be completely filled with subject medium to obtain accurate measurement.
  • Avoid the use of flexible connections and reducers at the unit connection points, unless in accordance with specific manufacturer guidelines.
The Coriolis flow meters of different manufacturers may have some particular recommendations, all of which should be followed to insure the best available performance, safety, and longevity of the unit.

Share your process instrumentation challenges and requirements with process measurement specialists, combining your process knowledge and expertise with their product application experience to develop effective solutions.

Quick Reference Guide for Pressure and Flow Instrumentation

Process mass flow controller
Mass Flow Controller
Courtesy Brooks Instrument
Brooks Instrument is a globally recognized manufacturer of flow and pressure instrumentation for scientific and industrial use. The company's product line ranges through:

Variable Area Flowmeters - Armored metal, glass tube and plastic for reliable measurement of liquids and gases

Mass Flow Controllers - Coriolis and thermal mass flow technology for precision fluid measurement and control

Pressure Controllers - Digital and mechanical pressure regulators and controllers deliver high precision gas control

Pressure and Vacuum Products - Pressure transducers, gauges, and capacitance manometers

Vaporization Products - Deliver controlled high purity vapor to processes from source liquid

There are many products and variants. The company developed a summary document that provides an overview of the various product types, enabling potential users to focus quickly on the instruments that will meet their requirements. The document is included below.

Share your pressure, vacuum, and flow measurement and control challenges with product application specialists, combining your process knowledge and experience with their product application expertise to develop effective solutions.





V-Cone® Flow Meter Conditions Flow For Accurate Measurement



Accurate measurement of fluid flow is a process requirement in many industrial operations. There are numerous methods employed in the measurement of fluid flow, of which the McCrometer V-Cone® is one entry with very particular advantages. Whether the application involves liquid, steam, or gas, this flow meter design, with its own flow conditioning built in, provides exceptional differential pressure flow measurements in a space saving format.

The video provides a clear illustration of how the V-Cone® design conditions fluid flow in order to provide better DP measurement performance. Share your flow measurement challenges with application specialists, combining your process expertise with their depth of product application knowledge to develop effective solutions.

Thermal Dispersion Flow Meter For Compressed Air and Nitrogen Measurement

thermal dispersion mass flow meter
Thermal Dispersion Flow Meter
Magnetrol
Monitoring compressed air usage in a factory or other operation where it is consumed is essential for proper system maintenance and attainment of energy efficiency goals. The ability to track down leaks and monitor compressed air usage enables stakeholders to work toward maximizing the return on an asset with substantial initial and operating costs.

Easy installation and simplicity of operation are advantages for any instrument applied in this manner, making compressed air flow measurement a good application for a thermal dispersion flow meter. With no moving parts and a simple operating principal, a thermal dispersion flow meter can be quickly installed and put into operation. A digital display of the flow measurement provides local information, and a networking connection or other signal output can provide for remote or centralized monitoring and data collection.

A cut sheet is included below that provides detail on technological, operational, and installation aspects of this simple and effective instrument. Share your flow measurement challenges with application experts, combining your own process knowledge with their product application expertise to develop cost effective solutions.


Miller Energy Introductory Video

Miller Energy is a Manufacturer's Representative and Distributor of Industrial Instrumentation and Process Control Equipment. Since 1958, Miller been committed to exceeding our customers expectations by providing an unparalleled level of customer service and local technical support. Miller Energy maintains two office locations in NJ and PA. The South Plainfield, NJ operation services the areas of Northern NJ, New York, and Fairfield County Connecticut and serves as our corporate headquarters. The Exton PA office serves the areas of Southern NJ, Eastern PA, Delaware and Maryland.


Energy Calculator Simplifies Chilled and Hot Water Usage Monitoring

Operator interface of Yokogawa Model 212 Heat Calculator for process monitoring
Yokogawa Model 212 Heat Calculator
Early in my professional career, I was a sales rep calling upon building engineers, maintenance technicians, and lots of HVAC related people. One encounter I had, many years ago, has always stayed with me. I was prattling on to a building engineer about whatever gear I was trying to promote for his chilled water system, and I must have really missed the mark. The engineer, clearly a man of superior experience to mine, stopped me in mid sentence. "You know what flows through these pipes?", he said, referring to the chilled water system. In my defense, I was very young and inexperienced at the time, but I did answer "Chilled water". My building engineer friend bellowed out, "Wrong....money flows through those pipes". That single encounter had a lasting impact upon how I viewed HVAC systems.

Energy costs for heating or cooling a building can be the single largest line item on the cash outflow summary for an operation. Much effort and expense is put into efforts to maximize energy efficiency and conservation. Monitoring of usage patterns related to the chilled or hot water system can provide useful information for developing new conservation strategies and verifying the impact of any steps taken to reduce consumption.

The Yokogawa Model 212 is an affordable and easy to install and use device that will provide a stream of usage data. A key feature of the Model 212 is its ability to interface with a broad range of flowmeter devices, including vortex and magnetic flowmeters with pulse outputs, positive displacement and inferential water meters, turbine and paddlewheel flowmeters. This flexibility allows the user to select a companion flowmeter that will suit their accuracy, budget, and operational requirements.

The Heat Calculator has four modes of operation to totalize the usage patterns in a manner that best suits the needs of the user. Additionally, the unit can interface with a building management system and includes internal data logging capabilities. Other features are described in the product data sheet I have included below.

Even small chilled and hot water systems can benefit from usage data derived from a monitoring system such as the Yokogawa Model 212. Share your system challenges with a product specialist. Combining your process and system knowledge with their product application expertise will produce effective solutions.


Data Acquisition - A Step in the Direction of Process Improvement

Data acquisition, like an equipment acquisition, is the procurement of an asset. Data is an asset. It helps an operator evaluate process or business conditions and make decisions that impact the success of the organization. Let’s define data acquisition as the sampling of signals that represent a measurement of physical conditions and the conversion of those signals into a numeric form that can be processed by a computer. A data acquisition system will generally consist of sensors, transmitters, converters, processors, and other devices which perform specialized functions in gathering measurements and transforming them into a usable form.

Industrial data acquisition equipment
DAQ incorporating data acquisition, process
control, recording, display and networking
in a single compact unit
Courtesy Yokogawa Corp.
Industrial process operators and stakeholders benefit from the collection and analysis of data by enhancing performance of valuable facets of the process or activity. Data acquisition, commonly known as DAQ, is widely employed in high stakes and sophisticated processes where there is a true need to know current conditions. A desire for increased profit drives the need for increased process output and efficiency. A desire to reduce risk of loss drives the need for reduced downtime and improved safety. Today, there are likely many useful applications for data acquisition that are not being tapped to their fullest potential. The modest cost and simplicity of putting a data acquisition system in place, compared to the benefits that can be derived from a useful analysis of the data for your operation or process, makes the installation of a data acquisition system a positive move for even small and unsophisticated operators in today’s market.

What we call DAQ today started in the 1960’s when computers became available to businesses of large scale and deep pockets. By the 1980’s, personal computers employed in the business environment could be outfitted with input cards that enabled the PC to read sensor data. Today, there is an immense array of measurement and data collection devices available, spanning the extremes of price points and technical capability. For a reasonable cost, you can measure and collect performance data on just about anything. You can get an impression of the simplicity, modularity, and compactness of a modern system with a quick review of this product.

Data acquisition has an application anywhere an operator or stakeholder can benefit from knowing what is occurring within the bounds of their process or operation. Here is a partial list of the many physical conditions that can be measured in industrial settings:


Industrial data acquisition equipment
Other examples of industrial data acquisition equipment
Courtesy Yokogawa Corp.
  • Temperature
  • Pressure
  • Flow
  • Force
  • Switch Open or Closed
  • Rotational or Linear Position
  • Light Intensity
  • Voltage
  • Current
  • Images
  • Rotational Speed

Consider your industrial process or operation. Are there things you would like to know about it that you do not? Would you like to increase your insight into the workings of the process, how changes in one condition may impact another? Do you know what operating condition of each component of your process will produce the best outcomes? Is reducing maintenance, or heading off a failure condition before it occurs something you would like to have in your operation? Applying your creativity, ingenuity and technical knowledge, along with the help of a product expert, will help you get the information you need to improve the outcomes from your industrial process or operation.

Valve Selection - When to Choose a Butterfly Valve

Industrial process control valves are available in a staggering array of materials, types, and configurations. An initial step of the selection procedure for a valve application should be choosing the valve type, thus narrowing the selection field to a more manageable level. Valve "types" are generally defined by the closing mechanism of the valve.

butterfly valve
Butterfly Valve
Courtesy Crane CPE
A butterfly valve has a disc that is positioned in the fluid flow path. It rotates around a central axis, the stem, through a 90 degree arc from a position parallel to the flow direction (open) to perpendicular (closed). A variety of materials are used in the valve body construction, and it is common to line the valve with another material to provide special properties related to the process media.

What might make a butterfly valve a beneficial selection over another valve type?

  • The closure arrangement allows for a comparatively small size and weight. This can reduce the cost, space, and support requirements for the valve assembly.
  • Generally low torque requirements for valve operation allow for manual operation, or automation with an array of electric, pneumatic, or hydraulic actuators.
  • Low pressure drop associated with the closure mechanism. The disc in the flow path is generally thin. In the fully open position, the disc presents its narrow edge to the direction of flow.
  • Quarter turn operation allows for fast valve operation from fully closed to fully open.
  • Some throttling capability is provided at partially open positions.
  • Small parts count, low maintenance requirements.
What may be some reasons to consider other valve types?
Butterfly Valve
Courtesy Crane CPE
  • Butterfly valve throttling capability is generally limited to low pressure drop applications
  • Cavitation can be a concern.
  • Some sources mention the possibility of choked flow as a concern under certain conditions.
Butterfly valves, like other valve types, have applications where they outperform. Careful consideration and consultation with a valve expert is a first step toward making a good selection.


Welcome to the Process Measurement, Instrumentation and Control Blog, sponsored by Miller Energy

Welcome! We hope (over time) you find this blog interesting to visit and it becomes a trusted resource for process measurement and control. We plan on weekly educational and informative blog posts innovative process control solutions, insight to how industrial controls work, and new products that solve tough engineering challenges. Please come back often!